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when am going to insert data into a child table for which i have added constraint(foreign key)

the constraint is automatically disabling.

can u please help me..........

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You need to clarify the flow of events here. What sort of constraint are you adding? When does it disable? Is the row you're inserting consistent with the constraint? etc. –  GWLlosa Jun 15 '09 at 12:34
    
initially i defined foreign key for child table..and checked its status .its enabled. when am trying to insert the records into that table the status of constraint is disabled. –  kishore Jun 15 '09 at 13:25
    
post code of the constraint and a sample insert data –  jle Jun 15 '09 at 13:26
    
actually its working when am inserting data by using normal insert statements. but the above problem is coming when am inserting data using sql loader. –  kishore Jun 15 '09 at 13:46
    
add the REENABLE clause in the control file see: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28319/… –  spencer7593 Jun 15 '09 at 16:19

3 Answers 3

From the Utilties manual, relational integrity and check constraints are automatically disabled for direct path loads. Conventional path shouldn't have this problem.

There's a REENABLE clause to enable the constraints at the end of a direct path load.

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The constraint can't "automatically" disable - check it's current state by issuing this SQL (as the table/constraint owner):

select status, validated from user_constraints where constraint_name = 'theNameOfYourConstraint'

It might be the case that it has been disabled prior to your operation. It will remain in that state until explicitly enabled.

[Additional]

I see from a later comment now that the disabling appears to be due to a direct path load in SQL*Loader. If you want to prevent this I think your only option is to use a conventional load and process the exceptions. Binding the file to an external table definition will allow you to use a more procedural approach since you can process the file as if it were an Oracle table.

From the Oracle docs:

Integrity constraints that depend on other rows or tables, such as referential constraints, are disabled before the direct path load and must be reenabled afterwards.

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i checked before inserting data..........the constraint is enabled. but when am inserting data into that table that constraint is automatically going into disable state. –  kishore Jun 15 '09 at 12:48
    
So I understand the sequence of events to be this: 1) you can look at the constraint with the sql above and see the status as enabled. 2) you execute an insert 3) you run the sql against user_constraints again and see the status as disabled ? –  dpbradley Jun 15 '09 at 12:51
    
yes exactly......... –  kishore Jun 15 '09 at 13:09
    
actually its working when am inserting data by using normal insert statements. but the above problem is coming when am inserting data using sql loader. –  kishore Jun 15 '09 at 13:46
    
Ok, sql loader - then you must be using a direct path load - correct? –  dpbradley Jun 15 '09 at 14:01

You'll have to provide us with some more information/code. Describe your constraint. How are you inserting records?

  • insert statement
  • calling a procedure
  • sql loader
  • etc.

Reproduce your problem:

select *
from user_constraints 
where constraint_name = 'theNameOfYourConstraint';

do your insert here

select *
from user_constraints 
where constraint_name = 'theNameOfYourConstraint';

and show us the output.

share|improve this answer
    
actually its working when am inserting data by using normal insert statements. but the above problem is coming when am inserting data using sql loader. –  kishore Jun 15 '09 at 13:47
    
That's kind of an important detail. download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B13789_01/server.101/b10825/… With the conventional path load method, arrays of rows are inserted with standard SQL INSERT statements—integrity constraints and insert triggers are automatically applied. But when you load data with the direct path, SQL*Loader disables some integrity constraints and all database triggers. This section discusses the implications of using direct path loads with respect to these features. –  Robert Merkwürdigeliebe Jun 16 '09 at 6:45

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