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I have a package-level function (Frob) that takes a function as an argument. For the function argument, I want to pass in a method (FrobMethod) with a particular struct instance as the receiver (myFrob).

The only way I've found to accomplish this is to use a func literal/closure that captures the target struct. That requires repeating the func signature and arguments, which seems too verbose. Is there a better way?

package main

import "fmt"

func Frob( frobber func( int ) ( string ) ) {
    fmt.Printf( "Frob %s\n", frobber( 42 ) )
}

type MyFrob struct {
    Prefix string
}

func ( m MyFrob ) FrobMethod( n int ) ( string ) {
    return fmt.Sprintf( "%s %d", m.Prefix, n )
}

func main() {

    myFrob := MyFrob { Prefix: "Hello" }

    // C# allows something like this:
    //
    //Frob( myFrob.FrobMethod )

    Frob( func ( n int ) ( string ) {
        return myFrob.FrobMethod( n )
    } )
}

...a real-world example of this is HandleFunc in net/http.

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not really at the moment. There is an open bug to get something similar to C# –  Paolo Falabella Apr 3 '12 at 16:04
    
@PaoloFalabella: OK, that's the kind of answer I was looking for. Thanks. –  lnmx Apr 3 '12 at 17:34
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3 Answers 3

In my opinion, idiomatic Go should use an interface instead of a function in this case:

package main

import "fmt"

type Frobber interface {
    FrobMethod(int) string
}

func Frob(frobber Frobber) {
    fmt.Printf("Frob %s\n", frobber.FrobMethod(42))
}

type MyFrob struct {
    Prefix string
}

func (m MyFrob) FrobMethod(n int) string {
    return fmt.Sprintf("%s %d", m.Prefix, n)
}

func main() {
    myFrob := MyFrob{Prefix: "Hello"}
    Frob(myFrob)
}

The function HandleFunc in net/http is a wrapper for function Handle which takes an interface argument.

share|improve this answer
    
I like how we posted almost identical code at the exact same time :-) –  jdi Mar 31 '12 at 18:56
    
I just figured out how HandlerFunc works... it's actually a function-based type that implements the Handler interface by invoking itself. So, it's easier to create an interface implementation from a function than the other way around. –  lnmx Mar 31 '12 at 20:35
    
@Atom: If I am right, you are from the golang group? Would you mind chiming in on the disagreement in my answer comment thread? –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 3:11
    
@jdi In formal terms, I am not a member of the golang group. –  Atom Apr 3 '12 at 17:53
    
I just meant a member of the discussion group, not the core team. –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 18:29
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While Go does allow you to create anonymous function assignments to variables and pass them around, another way to approach this problem is to make use of interfaces.

package main

import "fmt"

type Frobber interface {
    Frob(int) string
}

type MyFrob struct {
    Prefix string
}

func (m MyFrob) Frob(n int) string {
    return fmt.Sprintf("%s %d", m.Prefix, n)
}

func Frob(f Frobber) {
    fmt.Printf("Frob %s\n", f.Frob(42))
}

func main() {
    myFrob := MyFrob {Prefix: "Hello"}
    Frob(myFrob)
}

In an object oriented language, you would be able to just pass a method around, but Go isn't OO. You have to start your brain over from the beginning and not try to write the code like you would in other languages. I have that same problem coming from Python.

By the way, I love Go and am actively trying to improve my skills with it as a tool in my tool belt. In response to @Jeremy in the comments, I am only stating that Go is not OO because its not firmly supported to be such by the Go team, and its more commonly referred to as procedural, and, having a mixture of elements from other languages that are themselves considered to be OO

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The go developers may take exception to your statement that Go isn't OO. In fact they might be inclined to say that Go is not only OO but is in fact better OO. –  Jeremy Wall Apr 3 '12 at 2:49
    
@JeremyWall: I think you might be wrong on both points there. I don't think the Go developers would take exception to that statement, and Go isn't OO in a traditional sense. –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 2:54
    
I'm pretty sure they would. Go is very definitely OO. Saying it isn't OO in the traditional sense is not the same as saying it isn't OO. –  Jeremy Wall Apr 3 '12 at 2:58
    
@JeremyWall: If you follow the google golang-nuts discussion group, you will see them actively agree more than once that Go is not object oriented. Its procedural. So I firmly support that the Go developers would not take offense to this statement. –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 3:01
1  
@jdi My understanding is that Go has object-oriented features and it has objects. Go is more type-oriented than Java, more imperative than Java, and less object-oriented than Java. Whether Go is an OO language? - I try not to think about this question. –  Atom Apr 3 '12 at 17:50
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

As of Go 1.1, the C#-style method reference works:

Frob( myFrob.FrobMethod )

See the Method expressions section of the Go Language Specification.

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