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For an assignment, I need to make a "doll" in Java where you can move it around and rotate the arms and legs to make funny/cool poses. In addition, the legs should be able to stretch (but not get wider, this is important).

The way I wanted to handle the leg stretching was invert the rotation done to the leg to get it back in the neutral straight position, scale it in the y direction, and then re-perform the rotation. However, it appears the scaling is always going to be in the y direction, so once it's rotated, the leg will become wider. It will only look as it should if it's brought back straight and standing.

The code I have right now looks something like this:

leg.transform(AffineTransform.getRotateInstance(legAngle,pivot.getX(),pivot.getY()).createInverse());
leg.transform(AffineTransform.getScaleInstance(1,scaleFactor);
leg.transform(AffineTransform.getRotateInstance(legAngle,pivot.getX(),pivot.getY()));

How can I make sure the scaling stays relative to the image after rotation?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a couple of ways that come to mind. The first (simplest, but slowest) method is to render the stretched leg image to an image, then rotate and render that image. Another way is to use Math.cos and Math.sin to apply the proper scaling in each dimension for the desired effect in the image.

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In the second method, this means I'll also need to keep track of the scaled factor and apply a new scaling in the right direction after every rotation? – SpeedBurner Mar 31 '12 at 18:50
    
Essentially. It's a bit more state data to keep track of. Also, try creating the transform matrices and multiplying them on paper for a vector at (2, 2) to test both your code and any changes you make. It's possible there's some minor mistake somewhere in your series of transformations, especially if they occur frame after frame. – GGulati Mar 31 '12 at 18:53

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