Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public class Class1
{
  public static string Name="foo";

  public void ChangeName(string _name)
  {
    Name=_name;
  }
}

in some other class..

Class1 _c=new Class1();
_c.ChangeName("bar");

and the Name gets changed.. an instance changing a static member!

I thought a static member is available only for a Class. If a Class wants it can change its static members. But here an instance is able to change it indirectly.Shouldn't an instance not be able to change it? When we create an instance it occupies its own space in the heap without having access to the static members of the Class. So what is really happening here?

share|improve this question
    
How do you imagine the possibility for all outside components to be able to change static variable and removing the possibility for the class instances ? –  Dmitriy Reznik Mar 31 '12 at 19:52
    
This is a multithreaded nightmare. ;) –  Marc Mar 31 '12 at 19:56
    
Isn't it like a House (the instance) Deciding the fate of the blueprint(House Class) as well as other instances. If the blueprint wants it can change itself and then the houses created from this new blueprint get affected. Not a house deciding how the other houses should look. isn't it a point?? –  Suyash Mar 31 '12 at 20:00
    
i think its like this... the blueprint has given a house the capability to change the blueprint itself. –  Suyash Mar 31 '12 at 20:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No, an instance is not kept from accessing static members. Instances are separate from each other, but static members are available both to static methods and instance methods.

As you have made it public, it's not even only methods in the class itself that can access it. You can change it from anywhere:

in some other class...

Class1.Name = "Albert";
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't instance methods be able to only "get" those static members and not "set" them. I know this is how it happens but isn't it a bad thing. what about this scenario from my above comment : Isn't it like a House (the instance) Deciding the fate of the blueprint(House Class) as well as other instances. If the blueprint wants it can change itself and then the houses created from this new blueprint get affected. Not a house deciding how the other houses should look –  Suyash Mar 31 '12 at 20:16
    
@suyash: Static members are not part of the blueprint at all, they are like a community building, available to all instances, and shared by all instances. Don't try to think of static members as part of object oriented principles. They are affected by access modifiers, but they are not involved in inheritance at all. –  Guffa Mar 31 '12 at 20:22
    
this makes sense. but still i cant think of the scenario of how an object can decide the fate of other siblings (the access should only be get and not set). by the way if there is a public static member of a class, its accessible through the derived class. this adds to my question.. why should an object and a derived class be able to change a static member of the parent class. –  Suyash Mar 31 '12 at 21:05
    
@suyash: An instance of a derived class can change static members just like any other code anywhere else. The only difference is that you don't have to specify the class name, i.e. you can use Name = "foo"; instead of Class1.Name = "foo";. To control who can set a member, you can use a property instead of a variable, then you can make the setter private: public static string Name { get; private set; }. However, if you keep your ChangeName method, that could be used from anywhere to change the property, as it exposes the property outside of its own access limitations. –  Guffa Mar 31 '12 at 21:46

The important part is

public static string Name="foo";

which creates a changeable static property. This allows for

Class1.Name="bar"

from outside the class as well as from inside the class - inside the class you can shorten this to

Name="bar"

which is exactly what is called via ChangeName("bar")

You might want to consider

public static readonly string Name="foo";

EDIT

If you want to be able to change the value only from within static methods, consider using a setter/getter construct with appropriate setter logic.

share|improve this answer
    
but i WANT a class to be able to change its static member many times! cant do it if its a readonly –  Suyash Mar 31 '12 at 20:07
    
Well, so what's the problem? If you can change your classes static property, you can also change it from within the class - such as in your OQ code. –  Eugen Rieck Mar 31 '12 at 20:53

MSDN clearly states :

"While an instance of a class contains a separate copy of all instance fields of the class, there is only one copy of each static field."

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.