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I wrote a simple example, which estimates average time of calling virtual function, using base class interface and dynamic_cast and call of non-virtual function. Here is it:

#include <iostream>
#include <numeric>
#include <list>
#include <time.h>

#define CALL_COUNTER (3000)

__forceinline int someFunction()
{
  return 5;
}

struct Base
{
  virtual int virtualCall() = 0;
  virtual ~Base(){};
};

struct Derived : public Base
{
  Derived(){};
  virtual ~Derived(){};
  virtual int virtualCall(){ return someFunction(); };
  int notVirtualCall(){ return someFunction(); };
};


struct Derived2 : public Base
{
  Derived2(){};
  virtual ~Derived2(){};
  virtual int virtualCall(){ return someFunction(); };
  int notVirtualCall(){ return someFunction(); };
};

typedef std::list<double> Timings;

Base* createObject(int i)
{
  if(i % 2 > 0)
    return new Derived(); 
  else 
    return new Derived2(); 
}

void callDynamiccast(Timings& stat)
{
  for(unsigned i = 0; i < CALL_COUNTER; ++i)
  {
    Base* ptr = createObject(i);

    clock_t startTime = clock();

    for(int j = 0; j < CALL_COUNTER; ++j)
    {
      Derived* x = (dynamic_cast<Derived*>(ptr));
      if(x) x->notVirtualCall();
    }

    clock_t endTime = clock();
    double callTime = (double)(endTime - startTime) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    stat.push_back(callTime);

    delete ptr;
  }
}

void callVirtual(Timings& stat)
{
  for(unsigned i = 0; i < CALL_COUNTER; ++i)
  {
    Base* ptr = createObject(i);

    clock_t startTime = clock();

    for(int j = 0; j < CALL_COUNTER; ++j)
      ptr->virtualCall();


    clock_t endTime = clock();
    double callTime = (double)(endTime - startTime) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    stat.push_back(callTime);

     delete ptr;
  }
}

int main()
{
  double averageTime = 0;
  Timings timings;


  timings.clear();
  callDynamiccast(timings);
  averageTime = (double) std::accumulate<Timings::iterator, double>(timings.begin(), timings.end(), 0);
  averageTime /= timings.size();
  std::cout << "time for callDynamiccast: " << averageTime << std::endl;

  timings.clear();
  callVirtual(timings);
  averageTime = (double) std::accumulate<Timings::iterator, double>(timings.begin(), timings.end(), 0);
  averageTime /= timings.size();
  std::cout << "time for callVirtual: " << averageTime << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

It looks like callDynamiccast takes almost two times more.

time for callDynamiccast: 0.000240333

time for callVirtual: 0.0001401

Any ideas why does it?

EDITED: object creation is made in separete function now, so the compler does not know it real type. Almost the same result.

EDITED2: create two different types of a derived objects.

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1  
You probably need to run a lot more iterations that that to get a decent statistical measure. Are you compiling at the highest optimisation setting? –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 31 '12 at 20:20
4  
Your test is invalid, because the compiler can easily optimize both the virtual call (into a nonvirtual call) and the dynamic_cast (into basically a noop), because it knows that ptr really points to a Derived object. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 31 '12 at 20:22
3  
Write a function Base* createBase() which randomly returns Base* or Derived* and call it in each loop iteration. –  ipc Mar 31 '12 at 20:25
2  
Ehm, the title says dynamic_cast is faster but the numbers show virtual is faster. Which is expected, I think. –  user180326 Mar 31 '12 at 20:47
2  
@DmitryEskin: If you've turned optimisations off, then the results of the test mean absolutely nothing... –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 31 '12 at 22:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The virtual function call is similar to a function pointer, or if the compiler knows the type, static dispatch. This is constant time.

dynamic_cast is quite different -- it uses an implementation defined means to determine a type. It is not constant time, may traverse the class hierarchy (also consider mutliple inheritance) and perform several lookups. An implementation may use string comparisons. Therefore, the complexity is higher in two dimensions. Real time systems often avoid/discourage dynamic_cast for these reasons.

More details are available in this document.

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So, if I expand class hierarhy, dynamic_cast time will increse even more? –  D_E Mar 31 '12 at 21:06
4  
@Dmitry how it is implemented is defined by your implementation, but as a generalization yes, that's correct. the complexity of inheritance (number of bases and if multiple inheritance is used) is usually where the cost is introduced. if the classes are not related, your implementation may have a good optimization for that case. also note that there are a few edge cases which increase complexity -- dynamic_cast may fail where a singular base cannot be determined because two common bases exist. therefore, the entire hierarchy must be examined before returning. –  justin Mar 31 '12 at 21:20
    
Page 31 of the linked document has the pertinent details about a virtual call versus various dynamic_cast for several compilers (though I couldn't find where it told you which compilers were used). –  paxos1977 Jan 7 '14 at 23:13

You are just measuring the cost of dynamic_cast<>. It is implemented with RTTI, that's optional in any C++ compiler. Project + Properties, C/C++, Language, Enable Run-Time Type Info setting. Change it to No.

You'll now get an unsubtle reminder that dynamic_cast<> can no longer do the proper job. Arbitrarily change it to static_cast<> to get drastically different results. Key point here is that if you know that an upcast is always safe then static_cast<> buys you the perf you are looking for. If you don't know for a fact that the upcast is safe then dynamic_cast<> keeps you out of trouble. It is the kind of trouble that maddingly hard to diagnose. The common failure mode is heap corruption, you only get an immediate GPF if you are really lucky.

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It should be noted that the entire purpose of virtual functions is to not have to cast down the inheritance graph. Virtual functions exist so that you can use a derived class instance as though it were a base class. So that more specialized implementations of functions can be called from code that originally called base class versions.

If virtual functions were slower than a safe cast to the derived-class + function call, then C++ compilers would simply implement virtual function calls that way.

So there's no reason to expect dynamic_cast+call to be faster.

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