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There are many questions like this, but none of them seem to answer my question specifically.

How do you instantiate a new T?

I have a generic method, I need to return a new instance of the type in the type parameter. Here is my code...

class MyClass {

  public static MyClass fromInputStream( InputStream input ) throws IOException {

    // do some stuff, and return a new MyClass.

  }
}

Then in a seperate class I have a generic method like so...

class SomeOtherClass {

  public <T extends MyClass>download(URL url) throws IOException {

    URLConnection conn = url.openConnection();

    return T.fromInputStream( conn.getInputStream() );

  }
}

I also tried the following...

class SomeOtherClass {

  public <T extends MyClass>download(URL url) throws IOException {

    URLConnection conn = url.openConnection();

    return new T( conn.getInputStream() ); // Note my MyClass constructor takes an InputStream...

  }
}

But neither permutation of the above will compile! The error is:

File: {...}/SomeOtherClass.java
Error: Cannot find symbol
symbol : class fromInputStream
location : class MyClass

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think a common approach is to require the class of type T to be passed in like so:

class SomeOtherClass {

  public <T extends MyClass> T download(Class<T> clazz, URL url) throws IOException {

    URLConnection conn = url.openConnection();

    return clazz.getConstructor(InputStream.class).newInstance(conn.getInputStream() ); // Note my MyClass constructor takes an InputStream...

  }
}
share|improve this answer

Other than passing in a Class object and using reflection like in johncarl's answer, you could use a generic factory:

public abstract class InputStreamFactory<T> {

    public T make(InputStream inputStream) throws IOException;
}

And revise download:

public <T extends MyClass> T download(URL url, InputStreamFactory<? extends T> factory) throws IOException {

    URLConnection conn = url.openConnection();

    return factory.make(conn.getInputStream());
}

Each MyClass derivation could provide its own factory implementation:

public class MySubClass extends MyClass {

    public static final InputStreamFactory<MySubClass> FACTORY =
            new InputStreamFactory<MySubClass>() {
                @Override
                public MySubClass make(InputStream inputStream) throws IOException {
                    return new MySubClass(inputStream); //assuming this constructor exists
                }
            };
}

And the caller could reference it:

MySubClass downloaded = new SomeOtherClass().download(url, MySubClass.FACTORY);
share|improve this answer
2  
Agreed, this is probably the more maintainable and proper solution. – John Ericksen Mar 31 '12 at 22:39

You no need to use parameter here to call method. Because you have static method, will be enough to access fromInputStream method directly from MyClass, I mean:

return MyClass.fromInputStream( conn.getInputStream() );

Hope it will help you

share|improve this answer
    
I should have been more specific, The class I need to return is any class that inherits from MyClass, so returning MyClass.fromIn... Won't return the correct class, I'm expecting the fromInputStream method to be overridden by the super class, that or the constructor. – john-charles Mar 31 '12 at 20:31

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