Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I found the following regex from another Stack Overflow question: Change an element's CSS class with JavaScript

And have used it in part of my script with success, however in another it seems to be failing.

I threw together a very minimalist test case on jsFiddle, and it is also failing:

http://jsfiddle.net/ew47Y/1/

HTML:

<div class="foo" id="foo">
    hello
</div>​

JS:

$(document).ready(function(){
     foo = document.getElementById('foo');
     foo.className += ' bar foobar';
     alert(foo.className);
     foo.className.replace( /(?:^|\s)bar(?!\S)/ , '' )
     alert(foo.className);
})​
share|improve this question
    
I am confused by the mixture of jQuery and non-jQuery to do jQuery simplistic things –  zyklus Mar 31 '12 at 21:23
1  
I'm writing a library and I find it bad practice to make one library require another. –  Chris Sobolewski Mar 31 '12 at 22:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

That's because replace doesn't actually modify the string you call it on; rather, it returns a new string. So:

     foo.className = foo.className.replace( /(?:^|\s)bar(?!\S)/ , '' )

(By the way, you don't actually need to do this in raw JavaScript, since jQuery objects offer a removeClass method: http://api.jquery.com/removeClass/. So you could write:

     $('#foo').removeClass('bar');

or:

     $(foo).removeClass('bar');

)

share|improve this answer
11  
Pure JS function: function removeClass(e,c) {e.className = e.className.replace( new RegExp('(?:^|\\s)'+c+'(?!\\S)') ,'');} –  pppglowacki Jan 17 '13 at 15:18
    
If you want to remove all the occurrences of a class name use the g modifier at the end of the regular expression, like this: foo.className.replace(/(^|\s)bar(?!\S)/g ,''). By the way, the use of the non-capturing group (?:) is not neccessary here. –  Adam Jun 3 '13 at 14:33
1  
Note that the use of the word boundary metacharacter \b, like: foo.className.replace(/\bbar\b/g ,''), is not suitable here, because the word boundary occurs also between a word character [A-Za-z0-9_] and the dash - character. Therefore a class name e.g. 'different-bar-class' would also be replaced resulting in 'different--class'. However, as opposed to the above solutions, the "\b" solution doesn't remove the whitespace character \s before the class name, so a string e.g. 'firstbar bar' will end up as 'firstbar '. –  Adam Jun 3 '13 at 15:41
1  
@Adam: I have no idea what you're talking about. Your comment is the only place on this page that even mentions \b, so you hardly need to explain why it's inappropriate. And the use of a group is necessary; your personal preference for capturing groups (...) over non-capturing groups (?:...) is not of interest to anyone else. –  ruakh Jun 3 '13 at 17:20
    
Sorry for the confusion. I mainly meant to point out that the solution above (as opposed to the also possible "\b" solution) removes the whitespace which could be unwanted. I have rewritten this as an answer. We can now delete these last 3 superfluous comments here. –  Adam Aug 8 '13 at 12:13

Don't forget about classList.

el.classList.remove('boop');

http://jsfiddle.net/yXQL3/

share|improve this answer
    
not working (only) on IE 8, 9 and Opera Mini 8 caniuse.com/#feat=classlist –  maciek Jan 7 at 20:13
foo.className = foo.className.replace( /(?:^|\s)bar(?!\S)/ , '' );

or with jQuery (which you seem to be using):

foo.removeClass( 'bar' );
share|improve this answer

There is also a solution which use the word boundary metacharacter \b:

foo.className.replace(/\bbar\b/g ,'');

This can suite somebody, but be aware the word boundary occurs also between a word character [A-Za-z0-9_] and the dash - character. Therefore a class name e.g. 'different-bar-class' would also be replaced resulting in 'different--class'. However, as opposed to the above solutions, the "\b" solution doesn't remove the whitespace character \s before the class name, which may be desired, so a string e.g. 'firstbar bar' will end up as 'firstbar '.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.