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So, I'm a newbie at git, but I'm using it because I have my rails app deployed through heroku. My app generates a bookmarklet (which is just a js file) for each user upon sign-up. Unfortunately, when I deploy, all of the bookmarklets for the users on the live site get overwritten with the bookmarklets for the users on my dev environment. I've read some other questions about this kind of thing, and I know I'll have to add the bookmarklet folder to the .gitignore file, and something about rm --cache (but I'm not sure exactly what I'll have to do). I tried doing these things, but I'm wondering if the problem is that git is ignoring all of the files that are there now, but isn't ignoring the ones that are generated after doing the whole gitignore process. Either that or I'm just doing it wrong (this is very, very likely).

Any help is welcome. And sorry that this covers the same ground as a lot of other similar questions. I did as much research as I could.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
.gitignore applies to files that are not in the repository. It does nothing for files that are in the repository. Are your files in the repository? –  Greg Hewgill Mar 31 '12 at 21:50
    
Yes, they are. It's a rails app and they're in the public folder. –  Bon Champion Mar 31 '12 at 21:52
1  
Ok, I guess I'm not clear why you've got development user data in the Git repository at all. Have you considered storing your user data outside the repository? –  Greg Hewgill Mar 31 '12 at 21:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sounds like Heroku is cleaning out every file not checked in to your Git repository when you deploy. Modify your app to save the bookmarklets to a directory outside of your Git repository.

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Here some simple steps:

  1. Create a file .gitignore in the root of your repository, with the following simple content:

    /path/to_your/folder
    
  2. Add the file to your repository:

    git add .gitignore
    
  3. Remove the folder from your repository (this won’t physically delete the folder):

    git rm --cached /path/to_your/folder
    
  4. Commit

    git commit
    

After that, the folder should be removed from your repository and subsequent changes in it will be ignored by git.

share|improve this answer
    
better answer than mine, also quicker :) –  Castilho Mar 31 '12 at 21:55
    
This works to ignore the folder, but now when I push the site live with heroku, instead of overwriting the bookmarklets folder with the dev version, it overwrites the bookmarklets folder with nothing, thus deleting them. –  Bon Champion Apr 2 '12 at 14:06
    
Yes, being removed, the folder won’t get pushed now (as it simply does not exist for the repository). You might want to look into a different solution then, like having a user-specific folder and a default folder in which you put your development-related files, and modify your application to only use those default ones, if the other folder does not exist. Or even better: Store the things outside of the source, in a database or something. –  poke Apr 2 '12 at 17:12

Add the following to your .gitignore:

path/to/ignore/**/*

If there are already tracked files on that path, they won't be ignored.

You'll have to run

git rm -r --cached path/to/ignore/
share|improve this answer

@poke's answer is mostly correct, but the leading slash in the path name is problematic so I'm posting revised instructions.

The following steps assume the subdirectory inside your git repository is named foo.

  1. Make sure you're at the top level of your Git working directory:

    cd "$(git rev-parse --show-toplevel)"
    
  2. Add foo to your top-level .gitignore file:

    echo /foo/ >>.gitignore
    

    The leading slash says to ignore foo in the top level but not */foo or */*/foo, etc. The trailing slash says to ignore foo if it is a directory, but not if it is a file or symbolic link.

  3. Stage the newly modified .gitignore:

    git add .gitignore
    
  4. Commit:

    git commit -m "Add foo to .gitignore"
    
  5. Stop tracking the contents of the foo directory in the Git repository:

    git rm -r --cached foo
    

    The --cached option tells Git to not delete the foo folder from your working directory.

  6. Commit:

    git commit -m "Remove the foo directory"
    
share|improve this answer
    
This works to ignore the folder, but now when I push the site live with heroku, instead of overwriting the bookmarklets folder with the dev version, it overwrites the bookmarklets folder with nothing, thus deleting them. –  Bon Champion Apr 2 '12 at 14:06
    
@BonChampion: see my other answer –  Richard Hansen Apr 2 '12 at 16:24

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