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Is it possible to have this code work somehow? (Current get a compile error stating MMVertex2F4B2F does not exist) I don't want to wrap the 2 within another struct as that will effect the usability of the class within my existing code.

I need this all to happen at compile time, essentially the TemplatedClass needs to hold data regarding it's outer class that I can access later by creating an instance of TemplatedClass.

struct MMVertex2F4B2F
{
  MMPoint vertex;
  MMColor4B col;
  MMPoint tex;

  struct TemplatedClass<offsetof(MMVertex2F4B2F, vertex)> {};
};

Regards, James

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use struct MMVertex2F4B2F instead of MMVertex2F4B2F –  twain249 Mar 31 '12 at 22:17

4 Answers 4

you could put the data of your main class into a sub-type:

struct MMVertex2F4B2F
{
  struct MMVertexData {
    MMPoint vertex;
    MMColor4B col;
    MMPoint tex;
  } Data;
  struct TemplatedClass<offsetof(MMVertexData, vertex)> {};
};

(if you access the data members via member methods, you only have to adapt those to this change instead of all of your code)

Alternatively, the TemplatedClass<> could be declared standalone (not a sub-type) similar to a traits template.

The fact that your code doesn't work shows that its design is flawed.

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Thanks for your answer, wrapping it in another struct will break the usage of the class throughout the rest of the codebase. –  user1103741 Apr 1 '12 at 18:17

Note that

struct TemplatedClass<offsetof(MMVertex2F4B2F, vertex)> {};

isn't valid C++ code. Either this is a template specialization, which would be

template <> struct TemplatedClass<offsetof(MMVertex2F4B2F, vertex)> {};

(which doesn't seem like it would make much sense in this context) it's should be a declaration of an instance of the template, which would be

TemplatedClass<offsetof(MMVertex2F4B2F, vertex)> myInstanceVar;

For the rest, I agree with Walter's answer.

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Thanks for your answer. I wanted a struct declaration that I could then instantiate later on in the code. –  user1103741 Apr 1 '12 at 18:23

The offsetof macro is inherited from C, and it does work with POD structs, but it's not the best approach to referencing a member in C++. Parameterize the template on pointer-to-members.

template< typename client, MMPoint client ::* > // PTM parameter
struct TemplatedClass {
    …
};

struct MMVertex2F4B2F
{
  MMPoint vertex;
  MMColor4B col;
  MMPoint tex;

  // PTM argument acceptable despite incomplete class:
  TemplatedClass<MMVertex2F4B2F, & MMVertex2F4B2F::vertex> template_inst;
};

The template in this example accepts a pointer to member of type MMPoint within any specified class. You might use some other parameterization. Anything is better than byte offsets and casting through char *.

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I am using it to setup offsets into a vertex buffer used for openGL so I need the values of the offset to be an integer to pass into the various setup methods. Thank you for you answer. –  user1103741 Apr 1 '12 at 18:19
    
@user1103741 You can also roll your own offsetof template function using the pointer to member parameter. This will still break the circular dependency and still produce an integer. –  Potatoswatter Apr 2 '12 at 4:44

After sleeping on it I came to this solution which seems to work:

struct MMVertex2F4B2F
{
  MMPoint vertex;
  MMColor4B col;
  MMPoint tex;

  struct TemplatedClass;  //Use a forward declaration here
};

//The template will now work as MMVertex2F4B2F is fully declared
struct MMVertex2F4B2F::TemplatedClass
       : public VertDef <offsetof(MMVertex2F4B2F, vertex)> {};
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This can't work. You're defining a template without ever using the template keyword. –  Potatoswatter Apr 2 '12 at 4:43
    
Yeah my mistake it should have read: struct MMVertex2F4B2F::TemplatedClass : public VertDef <offsetof(MMVertex2F4B2F, vertex)> {}; –  user1103741 Apr 8 '12 at 12:11
    
I clicked "edit" and copy-pasted your comment into the answer for you. But the same typo is what prevented us from answering your question. I'm not sure whether to upvote or downvote. –  Potatoswatter Apr 8 '12 at 12:42

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