Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is what I have:

http://i.imgur.com/x3IzQ.png

That screenshot is as wide as my screen. As you can see, the image is stuck to the left side of the screen, and the Level information section is stuck to the right side of the image. That's what I want. However, I'd also like for the border around the Level information section to extend all the way to the right edge of the screen, like this mock-up I made in MSPaint:

http://i.imgur.com/qmbwF.png

Here is the code for that part of the page:

<div class="levelinfo" style="margin: 10px;">
    <span style="display: inline; float: left; margin-right: 10px; ">
        <img src="levels/googoogjoob - By Request Only v1.1.screen.png" alt="Screenshot">
    </span>
    <span style="display: inline-block; float: left; height: 240px;">
        <fieldset style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; height: 239px;">
            <legend>Level information</legend>
            <ul style="list-style-type: none; padding: 0px; margin: 5px;">
                [snip]
            </ul>
        </fieldset>
    </span>
</div>

Sub-question: As you can see, I'm using a fieldset to create that pretty little border around the list. However, using a fieldset for purely cosmetic purposes doesn't seem very "semantic". Is there any method of getting that effect with CSS, or at least some other, more preferable HTML tag? Or do you think using a fieldset is fine?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I would normally just put it in a div again or a table and do width=100% and that works everywhere thanks

share|improve this answer

This should be simple. take all your content and wrap it in another div called "wrapper" or something like that. give that div a width of 100% and also, give that div a border of whatever you want.

for example your HTML like this:

<div id="wrapper"> <!-- this is the div youll give the style to, to get the outline etc. -->
  <div class="levelinfo" style="margin: 10px;">
    <span style="display: inline; float: left; margin-right: 10px; ">
        <img src="levels/googoogjoob - By Request Only v1.1.screen.png" alt="Screenshot">
    </span>
    <span style="display: inline-block; float: left; height: 240px;">
        <fieldset style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; height: 239px;">
            <legend>Level information</legend>
            <ul style="list-style-type: none; padding: 0px; margin: 5px;">
                [snip]
            </ul>
        </fieldset>
    </span>
</div>
</div>

css:

#wrapper{
 width:100%;
 border: thin #ccc solid;
}

and that should be it. when you reload your page, you should see your already made content wrapped around the border.

Hope it helps ya.

share|improve this answer
    
But it's already all wrapped in a div, the one with class "levelinfo" and the 10px margin. I'm not sure you're reading the code right -- the div with class "levelinfo" goes all around everything you see in the screenshot (or at least should -- if I look at it with Chrome's developer tools it's got its height set to 0 for some reason, but that's another question). The first span contains the picture that says REQUEST KEN, and the second span contains the list with filesize etc. ... (I tried your method just in case but it didn't work, incidentally) –  Jack M Apr 1 '12 at 9:47
    
Yeah i didnt see that one, But either way, take the same example i used on my "wrapper" div and apply it to "levelinfo" div...since you have your CSS inline (i assume because of the "style" next to the div) then add my css there next to "margin"...so itd be something like this: <div id="levelinfo" style="width:number here; height:number here; margin:10px; border:thin #CCC solid; ">Your content here</div> etc. As for the height. if you dont add a height/width then the parent width will automatically take the width/height of whatever is inside it. –  somdow Apr 2 '12 at 11:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.