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I'm trying to implement TCP connection pooling and return a connection back to the pool using IDisposable. I'm wondering if my implementation is correct, it seems to be working but I think because the base class also implements IDisposable and finalize, my code might be leaky.

 public class BaseClass : IDisposable
 {
    internal bool IsDisposed { get; set; }
    private object someResource;

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    ~BaseClass()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (someResource != null)
        {
            // some clearn up
            return;
        }

        if (disposing)
        {
            //dispose un managed resources

        }
    }
}

public class ChildClass : BaseClass
{
    // adds some functionality
}

public class MyClass : ChildClass, IDisposable
{
    MyPoolManager manager = null;

    public MyClass(MyPoolManager manager)
    {
        this.manager = manager;

    }
    public new void Dispose()
    {
        manager.ReturnPooledConnection(this);
    }
}

public class MyPoolManager
{
    private static MyPoolManager instance = new MyPoolManager();
    private static object objLock = new object();

    private static Queue<MyClass> que = null;
    private string name;

    static MyPoolManager()
    {
        que = new Queue<MyClass>();
        // enqueue some instances of MyClass here
        MyClass client = new MyClass(instance);
        que.Enqueue(client);
    }

    private MyPoolManager() { }

    public MyPoolManager(string name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }


    public MyClass GetPooledConnection()
    {
        lock (objLock)
        {
            while (que.Count == 0)
            {
                if (!Monitor.Wait(objLock, 1000))
                    throw new TimeoutException("Connection timeout");
            }
            return que.Dequeue();
        }
    }

    public void ReturnPooledConnection(MyClass client)
    {
        lock (objLock)
        {
            que.Enqueue(client);
            Monitor.Pulse(objLock);
        }
    }
}

And you would use it like this in your program :

 MyPoolManager pool = new MyPoolManager();
 using (var conn = pool.GetPooledConnection())
 {
      // use the conn here
 }

 // when you reach here the conn should have returned back to the pool
share|improve this question
3  
What type of connection are we talking about here? –  Maciej Mar 31 '12 at 23:41
1  
+1 @MaciejDopieralski This is a good question because .NET already has a database connection pooling mechanism... –  surfen Mar 31 '12 at 23:48
    
a tcp-ip connection open to a remote server. –  newbie Mar 31 '12 at 23:50
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1 Answer

MyClass shouldn't define new Dispose(), because indeed it can lead to leaked resources (if it doesn't call base.Dispose()).

Instead, you can use another class:

public class MyClassWrapper : IDisposable
{
    MyPoolManager manager = null;
    MyClass myClass = null;

    public MyClassWrapper(MyPoolManager manager, MyClass myClass)
    {
        this.manager = manager;
        this.myClass = myClass;

    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        manager.ReturnPooledConnection(this.myClass);
    }

    public MyClass GetMyClass()
    {
         return this.myClass;
    }
}

Here is a great post on SO about implementing IDisposable

share|improve this answer
1  
super in c#? Super. –  L.B Mar 31 '12 at 23:49
    
thanks, I fixed it –  surfen Mar 31 '12 at 23:51
    
if i call base.Dispose() then wouldn't it be disposed off? I just want the object to return back to the pool, i'll be reusing it again. –  newbie Mar 31 '12 at 23:58
    
You're right, that doesn't make sense. But if you inherit from IDisposable then you should call base.Dispose to avoid leaking resources. I think you should make a wrapper (composition) around your connection that doesn't inherit from BaseClass. I'll edit my post –  surfen Apr 1 '12 at 0:04
1  
actually, i don't need to call base.dispose() because the object is never being disposed, it's being sent back to the pool. And since the app pool will stay alive till the app runs, the finalizer will kick in and dispose of the objects when the app shuts down. –  newbie Apr 1 '12 at 1:09
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