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I am trying to fill up my matrix with zeros. Unfortunatelly, in the following example, variables x and y are redundand:

self.matrix = [[0 for x in range(0, self.N)] for y in range(0, self.N)]

Multiplying list, copy only references what of course is not what I am expecting:

>>> matrix = [[0] * 5] * 5
>>> matrix
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]
>>> matrix[1][1] = "X"
>>> matrix
[[0, 'X', 0, 0, 0], [0, 'X', 0, 0, 0], [0, 'X', 0, 0, 0], [0, 'X', 0, 0, 0], [0, 'X', 0, 0, 0]]

So, is there any solution using a list comprehension to avoid redundand variables (x & y)?

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1  
@Ashwini: How is that helpful? –  Niklas B. Apr 1 '12 at 0:07
    
If I am not wrong then his problem is that when he's adding a value to a particular list item, it is also getting added to the other lists inside the list named matrix. and stackoverflow.com/a/8713681/846892 explains this behaviour of lists. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 1 '12 at 0:13
2  
@AshwiniChaudhary: He knows about that behaviour. The question is an entirely different one, though... –  Niklas B. Apr 1 '12 at 0:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The common idiom is to assign the result to the variable _, which signals a possible reader of your code that the value will not be used:

[[0]*self.N for _ in range(self.N)]

As you see, we can use the [0]*size idiom for the inner list because 0 is an immutable value. Also, you can call range with only one argument, in which case it is treated as the upper bound, with 0 being the lower bound).

If you want, you can build yourself a list build helper that supports creating lists of arbitrary nesting depth:

def make_multi_list(dim, func):
  if not dim: return func()
  return [make_multi_list(dim[1:], func) for _ in range(dim[0])]

Usage:

>>> make_multi_list((2, 2), lambda: 0)
[[0, 0], [0, 0]]
>>> make_multi_list((3, 2, 1), lambda: 0)
[[[0], [0]], [[0], [0]], [[0], [0]]]
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Thanks, that is what I am looking for! And very nice example you got me. –  ProblemFactory Apr 1 '12 at 7:19

Alternatively, you could do:

from itertools import repeat

self.matrix = [list(repeat(0, self.N)) for _ in range(0, self.N)]
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1  
Thanks, you're right. I've fixed the code. Using the repeat function isn't necessary when the language already supports this feature. –  Simeon Visser Apr 1 '12 at 0:05

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