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i have to make a device driver that returns a random number between 1 - 50 and am confused on how the buffer for my device driver works, and how to go about getting it to behave like /dev/random.

i made a test program to see how /dev/random works:

int test_read = open("/dev/random", O_RDONLY);
int get_random_num(void) {

  unsigned int random_num;
  read(test_read, &random_num, sizeof(random_num));
  return (random_num % 50) + 1;
}

and then this is my device driver's read function(concised version):

my_random_read(struct file* file, char* buf,
                      size_t count, loff_t* ppos)
{
    unsigned int random_num; 
    get_random_bytes(&random_num, 1);
    int my_num = 1 + (random_num % 50)

    int* my_num_pointer = &my_num;

    copy_to_user(buf, my_num_pointer, count);
}

when i run my tester on QEMU i get -1074311964 : /

how can i make it so that all i would have to do is replace /dev/random with /dev/my_random??

this is how i'm reading from /dev/my_random:

    read(test_read, &random_number, sizeof(random_number), 0);
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1  
I don't understand the question. You've posted a code snippet, then you ask how to emulate /dev/random, but your question title implies there's a bug. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 1:36
    
@OliCharlesworth after i compile and load my device driver (where the code snippet is from), i read from /dev/my_random and what's returned is -1074311964. –  Tim Apr 1 '12 at 1:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
unsigned int random_num; 
get_random_bytes(&random_num, 1);

You're using get_random_bytes() incorrectly. The second parameter is the number of bytes, not words:

void get_random_bytes(void *buf, int nbytes)

You're further returning private kernel memory to userspace:

my_random_read(struct file* file, char* buf,
                      size_t count, loff_t* ppos)
{
    /* ... */
    int* my_num_pointer = &my_num;
    copy_to_user(buf, my_num_pointer, count);
}

You've performed no validations on count -- you only have one, maybe two, bytes of actual random data here. The rest of the data is garbage stack data and you've leaked it to userspace here. This is a security flaw -- the kernel should not leak uninitialized data to userspace. (It might be garbage to rely on it yourself but an attacker that asks for ten pages of data from /dev/random should not get raw kernel memory.)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the response. i'll try using sizeof() in get_random_bytes and limit count to 1. –  Tim Apr 1 '12 at 1:51
    
You won't want to limit count to 1, either, as that is just one byte. sizeof is probably the better answer. –  sarnold Apr 1 '12 at 1:51
    
ok i made the changes and put a printk after: int my_num = 1 + (random_num % 50) and it's printing out a a number between 1 and 50, but the user space tester program is still printing out garbage like -1079978156 –  Tim Apr 1 '12 at 1:58
    
Is random_card also an unsigned int? –  sarnold Apr 1 '12 at 2:05
    
hmm i tried both, signed and unsigned but it still didn't work. passing an int* to a char* buffer is legal?? –  Tim Apr 1 '12 at 2:12

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