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For lack of a better example, let's say I have a container type defined that takes a single type parameter. Assume this container wraps a List of the same type. I would like to define a method on my new container such that whenever an operation is performed it delegates the call to the embedded list but it returns my container type as a result (possibly of a different type parameter). To accomplish this, I will use the implicit builder pattern from scala collections. Here's the basic structure:

class Foo[A](val data: List[A]) {
  def foo[C, That](pf: PartialFunction[A, C])(
    implicit bf: CanBuildFrom[Foo[_], C, That]
  ): That = {
    bf(new Foo(data.collect(pf))).result
  } 
}

object Foo {
  def newBuilder[A]: Builder[A, Foo[A]] =
    new ArrayBuffer[A] mapResult { r => new Foo(r.toList) }

  implicit def canBuildFrom[A]: CanBuildFrom[Foo[_], A, Foo[A]] =
    new CanBuildFrom[Foo[_], A, Foo[A]] {
      def apply(from: Foo[_]) = newBuilder 
      def apply() = newBuilder 
    }
}

So this works as I would expect returning a Foo[String] when my pf transforms from Int to String:

scala> val f = new Foo(List(1,2,3))
f: Foo[Int] = Foo@15172301

scala> f.foo { case x => x.toString }
res318: Foo[java.lang.String] = Foo@6ff763fa

While the previous example was based on having a CanBuildFrom that takes a 'from' type of Foo[ _ ], an element type of 'A', and converts to a 'to' type of 'Foo[A]'. What I would like to do is take a 'from' type of List[_], an element type of 'A', and convert to a 'to' type of 'Foo[A]'. Something along these lines:

class Foo[A](val data: List[A]) {
  def foo[C, That](pf: PartialFunction[A, C])(
    implicit bf: CanBuildFrom[List[_], C, That]
  ): That = {
    data.collect(pf)(bf)
  } 
}

object Foo {
  def newBuilder[A]: Builder[A, Foo[A]] =
    new ArrayBuffer[A] mapResult { r => new Foo(r.toList) }

  implicit def canBuildFrom[A]: CanBuildFrom[List[_], A, Foo[A]] =
    new CanBuildFrom[List[_], A, Foo[A]] {
      def apply(from: List[_]) = newBuilder 
      def apply() = newBuilder 
    }
}

Here I have passed my implicit CanBuildFrom parameter off to the List class directly so that it can build my Foo class to store the results in. However, when I run the same test, instead of getting a Foo[String], I get a List[String]. In other words, it is not using my implicit, it is using a generic version.

scala> val f = new Foo(List(1,2,3))
f: Foo[Int] = Foo@236f7a59

scala> f.foo { case x => x.toString }
res319: List[java.lang.String] = List(1, 2, 3)

So, my question is why? I would have thought that if my current type is Foo and I'm converting to a Foo and there is an implicit fn in scope matching the input parameter types (List in this case) then that would be the best match. Am I doing something wrong or is this for security reasons that the 'from' collection has the most precedence in choosing what collection it is converted to. Is there something I can do to bump up my implicit's priority?

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1 Answer 1

It uses the first one that matches. As there already is a canBuildFrom in the scope that matches CanBuildFrom[List[_], C, That] it uses this. You can see this by typing:

implicitly[CanBuildFrom[List[_], _, _]]
// => res3: scala.collection.generic.CanBuildFrom[List[_], _, Any] = scala.collection.generic.GenTraversableFactory$GenericCanBuildFrom@6a3a191e

You can however force the compiler to search for one that returns Foo by specifying the type of the variable you store the result in:

val y: Foo[String] = x.foo { case x => x.toString }
// => y: Foo[String] = Foo@76faf7d6
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comments. Yes i checked the implicit that was actually in scope earlier before posting. The thing is I don't want to have to specify a type, I want type inference to do the work. I was thinking my implicit should take precedence, but I guess that won't be the case until after it enters the method foo. The only solution I can think of is to replace 'That' with 'Foo[C]' so the 'to' type is explicit. That works, but the problem is that if I don't have support for the 'C' type with 'Foo' I'd like it to use a more general type (as per CanBuildFrom pattern). That won't work. –  Mike Apr 2 '12 at 2:33

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