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I am working on an application where users will be evaluating a piece of art and filling out a review form as they go along. They may spend a substantial amount of time on the form, so I want to save it automatically for the user, say every 5 minutes. I was hoping I could use javascript and set a timer for the 5 minutes and then have it basically execute the entire form via ajax and I could save the data to the database in case the user gets disconnected, etc. Unfortunately I cannot seem to find any way to do this. Getting the model updated with the data is not a problem, but I can't figure out how to get it to invoke the method (similar to how the action normally would when it was submitted.) I don't want or need it to re-render anything, just let me call a method to save the data. How can I do this?

Problems implementing the solution

I tried implementing the solution of the hidden command link but I'm getting some very strange behavior. I am not sure what is causing this. First, some background on the implementation. Form #1 creates a bean (None scoped) and puts it into the flash, then redirects to Form #2. Form #2 is the big form I was writing about, where I want to implement the auto-save. Form #2 has a ViewScoped bean. In the PostConstruct for this bean, it retrieves the value from flash, and populates a property field. So far so good. This works perfectly without the javascript. I can press the command button to submit the form, and all is well. However, when I introduce the javascript, when it executes I get a null pointer exception from the variable that should have been populated from the flash by the PostConstruct. How is this javascript interfering with that? Once I have populated the property of view scoped bean with the object, it should not matter if its removed from flash scope, right? FYI if I remove ONLY the javascript code and leave everything else it goes back to working fine when I press the button to submit.

Form #1

    <h:form>
    ... bunch of form objects ...
    <h:commandButton "Start New" action="#{someRequestScopedBean.someMethod"/>
    </h:form>

code for someRequestScopedBean.Method:

    public String someMethod() {
        // bunch of logic here
        FacesContext.getCurrentInstance()
            .getExternalContext()
                .getFlash()
                    .put("myFlashObj", myFlashObj);
        return "form2?faces-redirect=true";
    }

view scoped bean used in form 2:

    @ManagedBean
    @ViewScoped
    public class someViewScopedBean { 
        //bunch of properties here 

        @PostConstruct
        public void initialize() {
            this.myObject = (MyObject) FacesContext.getCurrentInstance()
                           .getExternalContext()
                           .getFlash()
                           .get("myFlashObject");
        public void saveDraft() { 
            // save to database
        }
    }

Form 2 page:

    <h:outputScript library="javax.faces" name="jsf.js"/>
    <h:form id="myForm">

       ... whole bunch of fields here ... 

       ... real button for user to submit ... 
       <h:commandButton value="Submit myForm" 
                        action="#{someViewScopedBean.save}" />

       ... hidden button for auto-save by javascript ... 
       <h:commandLink id="hiddenSaveDraft" style="display: none;" 
                      action="#{someViewScopedBean.saveDraft}" >
              <f:ajax execute="@form" />
       </h:commandLink> 

       <script>
           function saveDraft() {
                document.getElementById('qForm:hiddenSaveDraft').onclick();
                window.setTimeout('saveDraft()',15000);
           }
           saveDraft();
       </script>

    </h:form>
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2 Answers

Since you wrote down Javascript as one of your tags i'm going to assume you incorporate Client side Javascript code in your app.

First of all use a hidden <h:commandButton/> or a hidden <h:inputText/> ( I use the latter in cases where I need to hold some information regarding a certain variable)

In the form you are submitting add one of these:

<h:commandButton style="display:none" id="clickme">
  <f:ajax execute="@form">
</h:commandButton>

<h:inputText style="display:none" id="changeme">
  <f:ajax execute="@form">
</h:inputText>

In your Javascript code add this code to either click or change:

setInterval(function() { 
  document.getElementById("clickme").onclick();

}, 3000); // update every 3 seconds

setInterval(function() { 
  document.getElementById("changeme").onchange();
}, 3000); // update every 3 seconds

Both will work fine. Just make sure they are within the form you are updating.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured out the final solution, and the cause of problems I had implementing it the first time around. It had to do with WHEN the javascript was being fired. The script code was being fired at the exact point I placed the <script></script> block, which was before the page was completely loaded and probably before the DOM was complete. This was causing all kinds of nasty, including duplicate invocations of @PostConstruct.

I fixed it by using a javascript event listener to fire when the page was completely loaded. This is important because I am using facelets templating, and I didn't have access to the <h:body onload= attribute. The listener is a useful and elegant solution. The script block can be placed anywhere in the page. Here is what the script block looks like:

    <script>

    function saveDraft() {
        document.getElementById('qForm:saveDraft').onclick();       
        window.setTimeout(saveDraft,300000);
    }

    function initSaveTimer(e) {
        window.setTimeout(saveDraft,300000);
    }

    this.addEventListener("load",initSaveTimer,true);

    </script>

This will invoke the hidden button every 5 minutes to save the form.

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This is a solution to a different problem than initially asked. –  BalusC Apr 4 '12 at 15:24
    
Hi @Balus, not entirely. It solves my original problem, which was how to automatically call the save method. I was actually trying to implement your suggestion, when I ran into the javascript problem. I'm new to SO; if I'm not handling the situation correctly, I'm interested in learning a better way. By the way, what happened to your original answer? –  tcprogrammer Apr 4 '12 at 20:13
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