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This question is basically about pagination and sortable columns.i have 3000 records in employee table which i have fetched from database in dao in single go.I can show 20 records per page on webpage. So shere there will be 150 pages for paggination where each page showing 20 records. I have two questions on pagination and sortable column approach:-

1) If i simply go for pagination(no sortable column). should i send all the 3000 records to client i.e browser and do the pagination at client side in javascript or jquery. So if user clicks second page, call will not go to server side and it will be faster. Though i am not sure what will be impact of sending 3000 or more records on browser/client side? So what the best approach either sending all the records to client in single go and do the sorting there or on click of page send the call to server side and then just return that specific page results?

2)In this scenario i need to provide the paggination alongwith sortable colums(6 columns).So here user can click any column like employee name or department name ,then names should be arranged in ascending or descending order.Again Want to know best approach in terms of time response/memory?

Folks Not sure how come this question got lost? I am sure people on this forum must be having good answers on this.

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The effect of sending 3000 records of any meaningful data will slow the clients browser down considerably. I'd paginate server side. –  Brad Apr 2 '12 at 4:02
    
I dont have any idea how large data set affects the browser performance. Looks likes form your answer 3000 or more records will be difficult to be handled by browser. Is it? –  M Sach Apr 2 '12 at 4:24
    
Question: What's the probability/frequency of seeing the 'next' 20 results? If it's low, paginate server side. If moderate, still server side, worth the penalty. If high, STILL server side since the bottleneck and client side handling may not be worth it :) You can always use OFFSET and LIMIT to know which page to fetch :) –  PhD Apr 2 '12 at 4:58
    
PS: Unless the data you are sending back is quite small i.e. just employee name, id, some details I guess 3000 records wouldn't be THAT much so it may be worth to send them - but make sure this isn't premature optimization w.r.t. my comment above –  PhD Apr 2 '12 at 4:59
    
Nupul Thanks for replying. Looks like from all the answers that server side pagination is better option. But still to get it clarified completely, want to know what will be impact if do the pagination and sorting on client side instead of server side. I mean why its not agood option. Is it because it will take longer time to transfer such huge data on network? –  M Sach Apr 5 '12 at 5:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Sending data to your client is almost certainly going to your bottleneck (especially for mobile clients), so you should always strive to send as little data as possible. With that said, it is almost definitely better to do your pagination on the server side. This is a much more scalable solution. It is likely that the amount of data will grow, so it's a safer bet for the future to just do the pagination on the server.

Also, remember that it is fairly unlikely that any user will actually bother looking through hundreds of result pages, so transferring all the data is likely wasteful as well. This may be a relevant read for you.

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I dont have any idea how large data set affects the browser performance. Looks likes form your answer 3000 or more records will be difficult to be handled by browser. Is it?Also consider i am basically only considering Deskop/laptop clients for now not mobile clients –  M Sach Apr 2 '12 at 4:24
    
Browser will be able to handle the data (probably), but keep in mind that network speed is usually the slowest part of your application, often by several orders of magnitude. With that said, any extra data you send is very expensive. –  Oleksi Apr 2 '12 at 4:26
    
In that case request, respose will be slower only first time (when i am sending 3000 records all together). But it will be faster when user go for further pages as we can play with data at client side itself(no need to go to server). Again same question :). Which one is better clientside or server side(probaly it will depend on the scenario where user is unlikely go thru few pages we can go for server side but if he is likely to go thru large number of pages , we can go for clientside). Actually iam looking for these kind of detailed analysis. –  M Sach Apr 2 '12 at 4:54
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It is very unlikely that any user will actually look through 3000 records. You are right that client-side would be slow only on the first request, however it can easily be so slow as to deter users from your site. The overall responsiveness of your application will be worse, because of this one large wait period. One large wait period is going to likely be much more noticeable to the user than several smaller wait periods. Users might not even see the performance hit if you are transferring small chunks of data, but they will almost certainly notice a large data transfer at the start. –  Oleksi Apr 2 '12 at 5:00
    
Also, remember mobile platforms. Transferring a lot of data on a mobile browser will almost certainly make the application unusable because of the huge start time. –  Oleksi Apr 2 '12 at 5:02

I assume you have a bean class representing records in this table, with instances loaded from whatever ORM you have in place.

If you haven't already, you should implement caching of these beans in your application. This can be done locally, perhaps using Guava's CacheBuilder, or remotely using calls to Memcached for example (the latter would be necessary for multiple app servers/load balancing). The cache for these beans should be keyed on a unique id, most likely the mapping to the primary key column of the corresponding table.

Getting to the pagination: simply write your queries to return only IDs of the selected records. Include LIMIT and OFFSET or your DB language's equivalent to paginate. The caller of the query can also filter/sort at will using WHERE, ORDER BY etc.

Back in the Java layer, iterate through the resulting IDs of these queries and build your List of beans by calling the cache. If the cache misses, it will call your ORM to individually query and load that bean. Once the List is built, it can be processed/serialized and sent to the UI.

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I know this doesn't directly answer the client vs server side pagination, but I would recommend using DataTables.net to both display and paginate your data. It provides a very nice display, allows for sorting and pagination, built in search function, and a lot more. The first time I used it was for the first web project I worked on, and I, as a complete noobie, was able to get it to work. The forums also provide very good information/help, and the creator will answer your questions. DataTables can be used both client-side and server-side, and can support thousands of rows. As for speed, I only had a few hundred rows, but used the client-side processing and never noticed a delay.

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USE SERVER PAGINATION!

Sure, you could probably get away with sending down a JSON array of 3000 elements and using JavaScript to page/sort on the client. But a good web programmer should know how to page and sort records on the server. (They should really know a couple ways). So, think of it as good practice :)

If you want a slick user interface, consider using a JavaScript grid component that uses AJAX to fetch data. Typically, these components pass back the following parameters (or some variant of them):

  • Start Record Index
  • Number of Records to Return
  • Sort Column
  • Sort Direction
  • Columns to Fetch (sometimes)

It is up to the developer to implement a handler or interface that returns a result set based on these input parameters.

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dana Thanks for replying. Looks like from all the answers that server side pagination is better option. But still want to clarify why server side a good practice, want to know what will be impact if do the pagination and sorting on client side instead of server side. I mean why its not agood option. Is it because it will take longer time to transfer such huge data on network or browser will be slow because of such huge data? –  M Sach Apr 5 '12 at 5:58
    
I think there is a balance somewhere. Think of a hashtable vs a linked-list. For small record sets, a linked-list will work fine. But as the size of the record set increases, a hashtable will win hands down. The same is true for paging. Client side works will for small record sets, but as record sets increase in size, you are sending down an increasingly larger amount of data to only display a few records. –  dana Apr 5 '12 at 18:00
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The bottom line is that server side paging SCALES. You app may work fine to start with, but over time as your database gets more records, it will take longer and longer to stream the entire record set to the client. That said, there are certainly situations out there were you may never get too many records and client side pagination will always perform. But, if you develop a pattern that works for you in terms of server-side paging, that will be much more flexible over the long run. –  dana Apr 5 '12 at 18:01

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