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Given two structure in c:

typedef struct _X_
{
   int   virtual_a;
   int   virtual_b;
   void *virstual_c;
   int   a;
   int   b;
   void *c;

    /* More fields to follow */
}X;

typedef struct _Y_
{
   int a;
   int b;
   void *c;

   /* Same fields as in X structure */
}Y;

Q : Is it safe to say that ?

void foo_low( Y *y )
{
   y->a = 1;
   y->b = 2;
}

 void foo( X *x )
 {
   Y *y = (Y *)(&(x->a) )

   foo_low( y );
 }

Is it standard C ? will it work on all compilers ? Is there any problem with padding ?

share|improve this question
    
Why would you want to do that when there are trivial solutions that don't require casting? Why make life hard? – David Heffernan Apr 1 '12 at 7:36
    
instead of (Y *)(&(x->a) ) did you mean (Y *)x ? Why would int be casted to Y ? as x->a is an Integer. as a is the first param in X its address will be same as address of x but its a messup and hard to understand – Neel Basu Apr 1 '12 at 7:38
    
@neel no, the idea is to overlay to a point inside x. a is the 4th member of X. – David Heffernan Apr 1 '12 at 7:42
    
I dont know whats overlaying a point inside x :( can you be a bit more elaborate ? – Neel Basu Apr 1 '12 at 7:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

That should work. But since you need to access the same fields in two distinct ways (y->a and x->a are different), I would use union:

typedef struct _Y_
{
    int a;
    int b;
    void *c;

   /* Same fields as in X structure */
}Y;


typedef struct _X_
{
     int   virtual_a;
     int   virtual_b;
     void *virstual_c;
     Y    y_fields;     
}X;


typedef union {
    X x;
    Y y;
} Z;

Now x.virtual_a and y.a are in the same memory address.

And you can rewrite your code as follows:

void foo_low( Z *z )
{
   z->y.a = 1;
   z->y.b = 2;
}

void foo( Z *z )
{
   Z *w = z;
   w->y = z->x.y_fields;
   foo_low( w );
}

The only clumsy part is adding Y inside X.

share|improve this answer
    
The code and the structures already exist and code was written according to them. In the example we already have in the system two structures that work and function now we want to combine them into one while preserving the logic of pointer arithmetic casing hopes it shades more light on the issue. – ABRami Apr 2 '12 at 9:31

No, your function foo won't work, because a is in the wrong place.

Your example is clearly made up and tha's going to reduce the relevance of my answer to the problem you are really trying to solve, but this definition does something like I believe you are asking for:

struct header {
  int a;
  int b;
  void *c;
};

struct shared_fields {
  int a;
  int b;
  void *c;
  /* More fields to follow */
 };

typedef struct 
{
   struct header virtuals;
   struct shared_fields shared;
} X;

typedef struct 
{
   struct shared_fields shared;
} Y;


void foo_low(struct shared *ys)
{
   ys->a = 1;
   ys->b = 2;
}

void foo(X *x)
{
  foo_low(&x->shared);
}

However, this does not perform a cast, since one is not needed. If you really intended to set data via one struct and access it via another, this is not allowed in standard C (though there might be an exception for same-struct-with-different labels as described by Hubert).

I suspect that a better solution to the problem you asked about is the use of union which can often be used to do what you may have in mind. But strictly speaking, if you have an object u of union type and you set u.a, accessing the value of u.b before setting u.b has undefined behaviour. Though commonly people do not worry about that.

share|improve this answer

if both structs have identically structure it is ok. Names of fields inside the struts need not to be the same, but their types must be the same. Each subfield in X must match to a subfield in Y in its type and position. Names of fields can be different.

share|improve this answer
    
But their order is different. so pointer arithmetic may go wrong – Neel Basu Apr 1 '12 at 7:33

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