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We've created a simple game as an iframe application for facebook and we now want to use OG to make it more interesting.

The game: A user can challenge a friend and they both have to choose a card - in the end the user with the "stronger" card wins.

We don't have a website for this game - it's just the facebook app. We've read that an OG Object has to be represented by an actual object-page:

'you will now need to create a publicly accessible web page that represents this object using Open Graph metatags.' https://developers.facebook.com/docs/opengraph/tutorial/

Is this really necessary? And if not, is there any good tutorial or documentation about that? We found this post: http://facebook.stackoverflow.com/questions/7771321/open-graph-beta-can-it-be-used-with-facebook-iframe-canvas-application -> is this the solution we're looking for?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is possible to build an Open Graph app which exists inside Facebook's Canvas.

You still need to create URLs which represent each of your object instances, but they can be of the form:

https://apps.facebook.com/yourapp/foo/bar
https://apps.facebook.com/yourapp/foo
https://apps.facebook.com/yourapp?foo=bar

These map to URLs on your server like:

https://example.com/foo/bar
https://example.com/foo
https://example.com?foo=bar

You can publish actions against the apps.facebook.com urls - these will become your canonical object URLs. But the metadata which describes those objects must be present on your server URLs.

When you publish an action against an object with an apps.facebook.com URL, Facebook will make a request to your underlying server URL to read the metadata. But all links that users see will point to a URL with the domain apps.facebook.com.

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