Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get Segmentation Fault when I try to run my program. Can someone please help me find out what Im doing wrong?

Compiling with this:

    g++ sms_out.cpp -o sms_out
    g++ -c -fPIC SMSDispatch.cpp
    g++ -shared SMSDispatch.o -o libSMSDispatch.so

It should be a shared library and dynamic linking. I get Segmentation Fault when I try to run sms_out.

//sms_out.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include<cstdlib>
#include<fstream>
#include<sstream>
#include<string>
#include "SMSDispatch.h"
using namespace std;

string sms = "";

void sendSMS(string sms)
{
  SMSDispatch* sPtr=0;
  sPtr->sendSMS(sms);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  if(argv[1])
  {
    string input = argv[1];
    string test = "--author";


 if(input == test)
    {
      cout << "s149113" << endl;
      return 0;
    }
  }

  string line = "";
  string file = "sms_out.txt";
  ifstream myfile(file.c_str());


while(getline(myfile, line))
{
      string idnr, landcode, number, error;
      istringstream linestream(line);

      unsigned short errorcode;

      //Split the sentence
      getline(linestream, idnr, '\t');
      getline(linestream, landcode, ':');
      getline(linestream, number, '\t');
      getline(linestream, error);

  if(idnr == "") break;

  //Make string to int
    try
  {
    errorcode = atoi(error.c_str() );
  }
  catch (exception &)
  {
  }
  //Put together landcode and tlfnumber
  string nr = landcode + number;

  string txt = "Thank you for your vote!";
  if(errorcode == 100) txt = "Invalid question, please try again";
  else if(errorcode == 110) txt = "Sorry, only one vote pr. number";
  else if(errorcode == 200) txt = "Invalid alternative, please try again";
  else if(errorcode == 300) txt = "Missing a statement after other, please try again";
  else if(errorcode == 999) txt = "An error occurred, please try again";

  sms += "{\"ID\":" + idnr + ",\"nr\":" + nr + ",\"txt\":" + "\"" + txt + "\"" + "}\n";
  }
  cout << sms << endl;
  sendSMS(sms);

}

//SMSDispatch.h

#include <string>
#ifndef SMSDISPATCH_H
#define SMSDISPATCH_H
using namespace std;

class SMSDispatch{
  public:
  virtual void sendSMS(string json);
  };
#endif

//SMSDispatch.cpp

 #include <iostream>
 #include <fstream>
 #include "SMSDispatch.h"
 using namespace std;

/*virtual*/void SMSDispatch::sendSMS(string json)
{
  ofstream myfile;
  myfile.open ("sms_out.log");
  myfile << json;
  myfile.close();
}

int main()
{

}
share|improve this question
5  
What does your debugger tell you about exactly where the segfault is happening? –  Mat Apr 1 '12 at 11:24
2  
Raw code dumps are not a productive way to ask a question. Learn to use a debugger (read a tutorial, buy a book, attend a class); then narrow down your problem and ask a specific question. –  Kerrek SB Apr 1 '12 at 11:26
1  
I don't see you linking with libSMSDisplay.so. –  trojanfoe Apr 1 '12 at 11:28
1  
Replace if(argv[1]) with if (argc > 1). If argc <= 1 accessing argv[1] is illegal. –  Jasd Apr 1 '12 at 11:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your sendSMS function in sms_out.cpp you declare a pointer and initialize it to null-poiter (0). The next line tries to access an object via that pointer and call a member function. Since the pointer is null (which means it does not point to a valid object), this operation fails wilth a seg.fault

void sendSMS(string sms) 
{ 
  SMSDispatch* sPtr=0; // this sets pointer to null
                       // assign the address of a valid `SMSDispatch` object instead
  sPtr->sendSMS(sms); 
} 

To fix it, forst you need an instance of that type.

Depending on your need you can do

  • SMSDispatch dp; sPtr=&dp; or
  • sptr=new SMSDispatch;

In the first case, you could just as well do

SMSDispatch dp;
dp.sendSMS(sms);

In the secons case you will need to call delete sptr; after you don't need the object any more.

Also, note that in order to compile the program, the compiler will need the definition of the SMSDispatch::sendSMS function. By including the SMSDispatch.h header, you are only supplying the declaration.

You will either need to

  • add SMSDispatch.cpp to the g++ invokation for direct bundling of the code or
  • link agains the shared library by adding -lSMSDispatch to g++ options after building the shared library from SMSDispatch.cpp
share|improve this answer
    
like SMSDispatch* sPtr=&SMSDispatch; ?? –  Veronic Apr 1 '12 at 11:56
    
&SMSDispatch is not valid as SMSDispatch is a type. You need an instance of that type. Depending on your need you can do (1)SMSDispatch dp; sPtr=&dp; or (2)sptr=new SMSDispatch; in case (1), you could just as well do SMSDispatch dp; dp.sendSMS(sms);, in case (2) you will need to call delete sptr; after you don't need the object any more. –  Attila Apr 1 '12 at 13:22
    
Ah ok thank you, but I tried to write SMSDispatch dp; SMSDispatch* sPtr=&dp; sPtr->sendSMS(sms); but then I got a error: undefined reference to `vtable for SMSDispatch' –  Veronic Apr 1 '12 at 13:46
    
That is because you do not link with the generated libSMSDispatch.so Compile your main program like so: g++ sms_out.cpp -o sms_out -lSMSDispatch (see here for alternatives) Let me know if this works and I update my answer –  Attila Apr 1 '12 at 14:03
    
Tried to compile, but just got "cannot find -lSMSDispatch" –  Veronic Apr 1 '12 at 14:42

Dereferencing a NULL pointer will cause a segmentation fault:

void sendSMS(string sms)
{
  SMSDispatch* sPtr=0;
  sPtr->sendSMS(sms);
}

I can't see a reason for using a dynamically allocated object so suggest changing to:

void sendSMS(string sms)
{
  SMSDispatch sPtr;
  sPtr.sendSMS(sms);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.