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I'm working on a project of which I should store constant multi dimensional arrays.I would like to do it with a pointer which points to multi-dimensional arrays.However, I could'nt succeeded.I write this code but it didn't compiled.

int darray[1][2];
    int darray2[2][3];
    int (*p)[1][2];
    p= new int[2];
    p[0] = darray;
    p[1] = darray2;
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I would recommend making a struct for the constant multi dimensional arrays and then making a pointer for that struct –  twain249 Apr 1 '12 at 14:06
    
It's not clear what you want this code to do. Do you want p to point at darray? What is the purpose of darray2? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 14:07
    
sorry it was darray2 which is stored at p[1] –  user1305058 Apr 1 '12 at 14:09
    
@user1305058: Then this is really not clear. darray and darray2 are of different types (because they're different sizes). This can never work, because the compiler won't know how to generate the correct pointer arithmetic. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 14:12
    
@OliCharlesworth so you mean that I couldn't point to multi-dimensional array each of which has different sizes. –  user1305058 Apr 1 '12 at 14:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, let's go through your code line by line (OK, I'll lump the first two lines together)

int darray[1][2];
int darray2[2][3];

OK, this defines two two-dimensional arrays in exactly the way you (probably) expect. Note that formally, those are actually arrays of arrays of ints. More exactly, darray is of type "array of 1 array of 2 ints each", and darray2 is of type "array of 2 arrays of 3 ints each"

int (*p)[1][2];

This defines a pointer to a two-dimensional array of int, or to the first element of an array of such arrays. That is, the type of p is "pointer to array of 1 array of 2 ints each".

p= new int[2];

Here you are allocating space for two ints (i.e. an one-dimensional array of ints, of length two), and new returns a pointer to the first element of that array, i.e. a pointer to int. You try to assign that pointer to int to p, which is a pointer to array of 1 array of 2 ints each, as mentioned above. This gives a type mismatch and should not compile.

It's not entirely clear what you want at that point, but given that you do assignments to p[0] and p[1] afterward, and given that the return value is assigned to p which is of type int (*)[1][2] the obvious choice would be p = new int[2][1][2];

p[0] = darray;

This again doesn't work, because arrays in C++ are not first-class objects. That is, instead of assigning the value of darray to p[0] as the line would suggest (and p[0] indeed would have the right type for that) the rules of C++ say that the array darray is promoted to a pointer to its first element. That is, what this code actually tries to do is to assign a pointer to the first element of darray (of type int (*)[2]) to p[0] (of type int[1][2]), which of course fails. In C++, arrays are simply not assignable.

p[1] = darray2;

This suffers from the same problem, however note that even if arrays were first-class, assignable objects in C++, this still would be a type mismatch because p[1] is of type int[1][2] while darray2 is of type int[2][3].

Note that you get around most of those limitations (apart from the last one) by just wrapping you array into a class C++11 actually provides a standard class template called std::array for this purpose):

struct array12 { int data[1][2]; };
array12 darray;
array12* p;
p = new array12[2];
p[0] = darray;

With a bit more of programming you could also handle the assignment from larger to smaller arrays (your darray2 case) by copying only part of the data by hand.

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thank you very much, this has solved my problem –  user1305058 Apr 1 '12 at 15:09

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