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Lets say I have a Javascript object:

var myObj = {
 property1 : 20,
 property2 : -20
}

But instead of -20 for property2, I need to take the value of property1 and convert it to its negative within property2:

var myObj = {
 property1 : 20,
 property2 : this.property1 * -1
}

This doesn't work, but I think it illustrates what I want to accomplish.

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1  
I'm not sure why you want to do this. Multiplying by -1 is such an easy thing to do, and when you're doing it inline you probably don't even have to type-check to make sure the property you want to multiply is the same data type. Well, I take that back. Unless it's a trivial bit of scripting you should do it anyway, because how can you be sure the value of property1 hasn't been changed to be NaN? – Robusto Apr 1 '12 at 14:20
    
I think the more general question is whether, within an object literal, the value of a property can be an expression involving one or more other properties of the same inchoate object. – Pointy Apr 1 '12 at 14:22
2  
(The answer is "no" by the way.) – Pointy Apr 1 '12 at 14:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I could suggest you the following

var myObj = {
    property1 : 20,
    get_property2 : function() {
        return this.property1 * -1;
    },
    set_property2 : function(value) {
        this.property1 = value * -1;
    }
}

Edit

Seems that this is a dependant property so it is readonly. But I've edited the code so that it is also writable.

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You can't do that. You can assign it later, though:

var myObj = {
    property1: 20
};

myObj.property2 = -myObj.property1;
share|improve this answer

You can use this:

var myObj = {
   property1 : 20,
   get property2() {    return this.property1 * -1;   }
};

But you can only read property2 property.

Defining setter of property2 will not be a problem. See JavaScript Getters and Setters link.

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