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I have two tables

Parent: id INT, name VARCHAR, ...
Child:  parent INT, uploaded TIMESTAMP, ...

Child.parent is a foreign key to Parent.id and there may be any number of children for the parent.

I am trying to run a query to find the n Parent rows with the most recently-uploaded children. I am willing to fudge this definition a bit in order to make it fast (consider only parents which have one child, perhaps, or find the parents of the n-most-recent children).

Here's essentially what I have now

SELECT
...,
(SELECT uploaded
    FROM Child C
    WHERE C.parent = P.id
    HAVING uploaded = MAX(uploaded)
    LIMIT 1
) AS date_uploaded
FROM Parent P
WHERE P.id IN (
    SELECT parent
    FROM Child
    ORDER BY uploaded DESC
    LIMIT $n
)
ORDER BY date_uploaded DESC

No good: This version of MySQL doesn't yet support 'LIMIT & IN/ALL/ANY/SOME subquery'

Here's something which gets results, but runs far, far too slowly (yes, everything is indexed)

SELECT
...,
(SELECT uploaded
FROM Child C
WHERE C.parent = P.id
ORDER BY uploaded DESC
LIMIT 1)
AS date_uploaded
FROM ...
WHERE P.id IN (
    SELECT parent FROM Child
    GROUP BY parent
    HAVING COUNT(*) = 1
)
ORDER BY date_uploaded DESC
LIMIT $n

The first one tries to take the n-most-recent children, and doesn't work. The second one tries to take parents with only one child (which implies most-recenthood), it works but takes half a minute to run.

Can anyone please tell me how to make the first one work or the second one fast?

The definition of the result set is a bit flexible. Ideally there will be exactly n results (in the first version, if one parent has n children which are globally most-recent, there will be only one result) so the second one is better in that sense, but I will accept other compromises.

share|improve this question
    
Most recently uploaded children would be a date range would it not, then a simple join back to parent. Parent of last uploaded child max uploaded) would be simply all parents with at least one uploaded child. Not getting waht you want, perhaps a bit of sample data and expected result would be a good addition to the question. – Tony Hopkinson Apr 1 '12 at 14:54
    
I used to do an INNER JOIN of a child table where timestam_field = (SELECT MAX(timestamp) FROM child_table WHERE parent_id = p.id and since it's slow I decided to have a ON INSERT trigger on child table that updates a column in parent table with the data from child table. That avoids the need for aggregate function or subquery since you join a child table based on that column in parent table (whether it's child's ID or child's TIMESTAMP doesn't matter). Basically, I'm suggesting an alteration of your tables, I've no idea if you are able/willing to do so. – N.B. Apr 1 '12 at 15:09

Can you not simply find the n parents in order of last uploaded children

SELECT p.id,
       MAX(uploaded) AS latest_upload
FROM Parent p
    INNER JOIN Child c ON p.id=c.parent
GROUP BY p.id
ORDER BY latest_upload DESC
LIMIT n
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