Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

this is a question on overloading the output operator in C++: How do you overload << on BOTH the base class and the derived class? Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;


class Base{
public:
virtual char* name(){ return "All your base belong to us.";}
};

class Child : public Base{
public:
virtual char* name(){ return "All your child belong to us.";}
};


ostream& operator << (ostream& output, Base &b){
output << "To Base: " << b.name() ;
return output;}

ostream& operator << (ostream& output, Child &b){
output << "To Child: " << b.name() ;
return output;}


int main(){

Base* B;
B = new Child;

cout << *B << endl;

return 0;

}

The output is

To Base: All your child belong to us."

so the name() in Child shadowed that of Base; but the overloading of << does not descend from Base to Child. How can I overload << such that, when its argument is in Base it uses ONLY the Base version of << ?

I want "To Child: All your child belong to us." to be output in this case.

share|improve this question
    
The version of operator<< that is being used is operator<<( ostream&, Base& );. The (non-) problem is that name() is virtual in Base so this version of op<< is calling the "correct" version of name() based on the dynamic type of the object being output. –  Charles Bailey Apr 1 '12 at 16:32
    
It's not shadowed, it's overridden. –  Philipp Apr 1 '12 at 16:32
    
Not sure I understand the problem. The fact that it prints "child" means that it is correctly calling Child::name at runtime. Why does it matter that it's calling operator<<(ostream&, Base &)? –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 16:32
2  
@Philipp: Actually, after re-reading the question, I think the OP wants the opposite of virtual behaviour. He wants operator <<(ostream &, Base &) to call Base::name. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 16:35
1  
@pfng: Can you clarify exactly what you want the output to be? –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 16:36
show 4 more comments

2 Answers

Make it a virtual function.

class Base{
public:
  virtual const char* name() const { return "All your base belong to us.";}
  inline friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& output, const Base &b)
  {
    return b.out(output);
  }
private:
  virtual ostream& out(ostream& o) const { return o << "To Base: " << name(); }
};

class Child : public Base{
public:
  virtual const char* name() const { return "All your child belong to us.";}
private:
  virtual ostream& out(ostream& o) const { return o << "To Child: " << name(); }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Well, sure. But this doesn't really add anything that isn't already happening. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 16:33
    
It should print "To Child" instead of "To Base". –  ipc Apr 1 '12 at 16:34
    
I realise that. But it's a trivial extension of the code that the OP already has. (It's only one step removed from putting the "To Base:" inside the name() method.) –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 16:41
add comment
int main(){

Base* B;
B = new Child;

cout << ( Child &) *B << endl;

return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.