Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to query SQL Server database from C#

I have class

Class_A 
{
  public fetch((string name, string last_name))
  {
    SqlConnection conn = null;
    double val = 0;
    string server = "123.444.22.sss";
    string dbase = "xyz";
    string userid = "cnsk";
    string password = "xxxxxx";
    string connection = "Data Source=" + server + ";Initial Catalog=" + dbase 
                        + ";User ID=" + userid + ";Password=" + password;

    conn = new SqlConnection(connection);

    try
    {
      conn.Open();
    }
    catch(Exception)
    {
      string e = "Database error contact administrator";
      MessageBox.Show(e, "Error!");
    }
    try
    {
      SqlDataReader myReader = null;
      SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand("select * from table where NAME"
         + " = name and LAST_NAME = last_name", conn);
      myReader = myCommand.ExecuteReader();
      while (myReader.Read())
      {
        //do something

      }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
      Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
    }
    return (0);
  }
}

There is a problem in my query.

When I give normal query "select * from table" --- this gives me perfect results.

But when I try to give where condition it gives me error. Any suggestions, to fix this? Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
This is prone to SQL injection. Don't forget to sanitize your data before inserting it in a query. – rcdmk Apr 1 '12 at 17:06
    
Based on the answers provided by the others I would have come up with this: SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand(String.Format("select * from table where NAME = '{0}' and LAST_NAME = '{1}'", name, last_name), conn); – Silvermind Apr 1 '12 at 17:06
2  
@Silvermind that is very open to sql injections en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL_injection – Erik Philips Apr 1 '12 at 17:26
    
@ErikPhilips, I agree. +1 to indicate that your comment matters. I'm more a Linq2Entities guy, so I don't suffer from these problems ;). – Silvermind Apr 1 '12 at 18:14
    
@Silvermind I am too, until I have to update table set bitfield = 1 where somefield = somevalue... 43,563 rows affected – Erik Philips Apr 1 '12 at 18:37
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try adding quotes around the values in the where clause like this:

select * from table where NAME = 'name' and LAST_NAME = 'last_name'

In your case where you are using variables you need to add the quotes and then concatenate the values of the variables into the string. Or you could use String.Format like this:

var sql = String.Format("select * from table where [NAME] = '{0}' and LAST_NAME = '{1}'", name, last_name);
SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand(sql);
share|improve this answer
    
name and last_name are the variable names – Csharp_learner Apr 1 '12 at 17:06
3  
GO Sql Injection Attacks! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL_injection – Erik Philips Apr 1 '12 at 17:26
    
also if you are going to use a reserved work its best to use square brackets [name] for example – krystan honour Apr 2 '12 at 14:41
    
@krystanhonour good point - i've updated – Robbie Apr 2 '12 at 15:05

Use a parameterised query, and more usings, and stop with the generic exceptions.

something like this where somName and SomeLastName are the values that you wan t to query for.

String sql = "Select * From SomeTable Where [Name] = @Name and [Last_Name] = @LastName";
try
{
  using(SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connection))
  {
    conn.Open();
    using( SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql,conn))
    {
      command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("Name", DbType.String,someName));
      command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("LastName", DbType.String,someLastName));
      using(IDataReader myReader = command.ExecuteReader())
      {
        while (myReader.Read())
        {
           //do something
        }
      }
    }
  } 
  return 0; // Huh?
}
catch(SqlException sex)
{
   Console.Writeline(String.Format("Error - {0}\r\n{1}",sex.Message, sex.StackTace))
}

NB not checked might be a silly in it

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for Using, it is frighteningly uncommon on so many SO questions. Take a look at SqlConnectionStringBuilder msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dce36088.aspx as well (hidden gem people hardly use for some reason) – Erik Philips Apr 1 '12 at 17:28
    
I know about that one, but rarely bother with it, has it's uses though. It's painful to me how often we shoot ourselves in the foot by being in too much of hurry to bother to aim as well. – Tony Hopkinson Apr 1 '12 at 18:03

Try

select * from table where NAME = 'name' and LAST_NAME = 'last_name'

instead of

select * from table where NAME = name and LAST_NAME = last_name

Edit:

If name and last_name are your parameters then try this:

SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand("select * from table where NAME = @name and LAST_NAME = @last_name", conn); 
myCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue( "@name", name );
myCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue( "@last_name", last_name );

Using parameterized commands means that you are invulnerable to a potential huge security hole - sql injection which is possible when command text is manually concatenated.

share|improve this answer

The text needs to be quoted as others have said--but that's not really the right answer here. Even without malice you're going to run into trouble with the Irish here, look what happens when you try to look for Mr. O'Neill. Use parameters instead.

share|improve this answer

To access the variables, you have to concatenate the string and add single quotes:

SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand("select * from table where NAME = '" + name
+ "' and LAST_NAME = '" + last_name +"'" ,conn);

Building sql commands as strings by hand should be considered a legacy technology. A better approach is to use a OR-mapper such as linq-to-sql or Entity Framework. If you just want to have something really simple to get started with I'd recommend linq-to-sql.

share|improve this answer
    
using parameterized commands solves the security problem and still could be simpler than employing an ormapper. – Wiktor Zychla Apr 1 '12 at 17:11
    
Yes parameterized commands is a step in the right direction, but I consider that a legacy technology too. It's 2012 and linq has been around for years and gives full type safety and easier coding. – Anders Abel Apr 1 '12 at 17:21
    
True, to the last word. It seems just too difficult for the OP at the moment. – Wiktor Zychla Apr 1 '12 at 17:37
    
Aye got to start somewhere and a good understanding of these basics will help with LinqToSQl or OrMappers etc. Lost count of teh number of questions for how do I do this is this, when they don't know how to do it in the above anyway. Lot's of people still using FrameWork 2 as well. Including large lumps of the stuff I work on. Lowest common denominator time. Besides it works, and you can see why. – Tony Hopkinson Apr 1 '12 at 18:06
    
That said, concatenating strings for queries anywhere where user input is involved is a total non-starter. Can't break the rules properly if you don't know them. And many who go straght into Linq, EF, POCO etc, don't.. – Tony Hopkinson Apr 1 '12 at 18:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.