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Doing code analysis of the project and get the message "Reference-counted object is used after it is released" on the line [defaults setObject: deviceUuid forKey: @ "deviceUuid"];

I watched this topic Obj-C, Reference-counted object is used after it is released? But the solution is not found. ARC disabled.

// Get the users Device Model, Display Name, Unique ID, Token & Version Number
UIDevice *dev = [UIDevice currentDevice];
NSString *deviceUuid;
if ([dev respondsToSelector:@selector(uniqueIdentifier)])
    deviceUuid = dev.uniqueIdentifier;
else {
    NSUserDefaults *defaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
    id uuid = [defaults objectForKey:@"deviceUuid"];
    if (uuid)
        deviceUuid = (NSString *)uuid;
    else {
        CFStringRef cfUuid = CFUUIDCreateString(NULL, CFUUIDCreate(NULL));
        deviceUuid = (NSString *)cfUuid;
        CFRelease(cfUuid);
        [defaults setObject:deviceUuid forKey:@"deviceUuid"];
    }
}

Please help find the cause.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand what "my project off ARC" means. Do you have ARC enabled or do you have ARC disabled? –  rob mayoff Apr 1 '12 at 17:05
    
Sorry. ARC disabled. –  EndyVelvet Apr 1 '12 at 17:07
1  
BTW, you probably shouldn't be using be calling UIDevice's uniqueIdentifier method since it's been deprecated, and its use will likely result in your app being rejected when you submit it to the App Store (according to several news outlets) –  Z S Apr 1 '12 at 17:27
    
I think this code is trying to work around that rejection. However, I don't think it will work: Apple hasn't made Cocoa Touch stop responding to the selector, have they? They're just rejecting anyone who uses it. –  Steven Fisher Apr 1 '12 at 17:29
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problems is here:

    CFStringRef cfUuid = CFUUIDCreateString(NULL, CFUUIDCreate(NULL));
    deviceUuid = (NSString *)cfUuid;
    CFRelease(cfUuid);
    [defaults setObject:deviceUuid forKey:@"deviceUuid"];

Let's go through what this actually does:

    CFStringRef cfUuid = CFUUIDCreateString(NULL, CFUUIDCreate(NULL));

A CFUUID is created (and leaked). A CFStringRef is created and assigned to cfUuid. (Note: The name cfUuid implies that cfUuid is a CFUUIDRef. Of course, it isn't; it's a CFStringRef.)

    deviceUuid = (NSString *)cfUuid;

That same CFStringRef is type cast and assigned to deviceUuid. This is not a new instance of NSString or CFStringRef, it's just a typecast of the same instance.

    CFRelease(cfUuid);

You release the CFStringRef. Since the NSString points to the same object, you also release it.

    [defaults setObject:deviceUuid forKey:@"deviceUuid"];

And here, you use the typecasted object, which was released before.

THe simplest fix to the stale pointer is this:

    CFStringRef cfUuid = CFUUIDCreateString(NULL, CFUUIDCreate(NULL));
    deviceUuid = (NSString *)cfUuid;
    [defaults setObject:deviceUuid forKey:@"deviceUuid"];
    CFRelease(cfUuid);

But this code is dangerous, and you already know why: deviceUuid is also invalid. But this isn't obvious, so you can trip on it later. Also, it doesn't fix the CFUUID leak.

To fix the CFStringRef leak, you could use this:

    deviceUuid = (NSString *)CFUUIDCreateString(NULL, CFUUIDCreate(NULL));
    [defaults setObject:deviceUuid forKey:@"deviceUuid"];
    [deviceUuid autorelease]; // or release, if you don't need it in code not
                              // included in your post

However, this still doesn't fix the CFUUID leak.

    CFUUIDRef cfuuid = CFUUIDCreate(NULL);
    deviceUuid = (NSString *)CFUUIDCreateString(NULL, cfuuid);
    CFRelease(cfuuid);
    [defaults setObject:deviceUuid forKey:@"deviceUuid"];
    [deviceUuid autorelease]; // or release, if you don't need it in code not
                              // included in your post
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. In your first example, the same message but on the line CFStringRef cfUuid = CFUUIDCreateString(NULL, CFUUIDCreate(NULL)); The second example shows the same line, here's a screenshot img849.imageshack.us/img849/8519/20120401215928.png –  EndyVelvet Apr 1 '12 at 18:00
    
Oops. I'll have to revise the answer a bit. Thanks for pointing that out. –  Steven Fisher Apr 1 '12 at 18:25
    
Done. I should also point out that this is a great place to learn Objective C Categories, if you're so inclined. All of this code can be written in a category. –  Steven Fisher Apr 1 '12 at 18:36
    
Thank you very much Steven. You helped me a lot! –  EndyVelvet Apr 1 '12 at 20:37
    
You're very welcome. Note also "Z S"'s comment on your original post, it may save you a review cycle later. :) –  Steven Fisher Apr 1 '12 at 21:41
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The problem is Here:

CFRelease(cfUuid); 

You shouldn't release that, you should release deviceUuid when you are done with that.

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1  
I'd also add that it's very misleading to assign variables like that - why not just do deviceUuid = (NSString *)CFUUIDCreateString(NULL, CFUUIDCreate(NULL)); - that way there's no chance of ambiguity :) –  deanWombourne Apr 1 '12 at 17:13
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