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I have programmed a class called HugeInteger which can do arithmetic (add, sub, multiply) with numbers of "infinitely" size. It treats each bit of the digit in the number as a stand-alone digit (e.g. 1234 = 1, 2, 3 and 4). I store these numbers in a vector (vector<short>). Now, because each digit only can take the values from 0 to 9, i don't really need to store them as a 2 byte digit. Is there a way (without using char) to store the digits as a 1 byte unsigned integer? Thanks!

Update:

vector<unsigned char> v;
v.push_back(1);
v.push_back(2);

for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); i++)
    cout << v[i];

This produces an unwanted output. Which datatype should I use to iterate through the vector?

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Why without using char? –  jwodder Apr 1 '12 at 17:44
1  
The header <cstdint> provides a type named "uint8_t" - if your environment supports such a type. Please note that "uint8_t" can be a typedef for 'unsigned char'. So overloading might not work as expected in all cases. –  nosid Apr 1 '12 at 17:47
3  
unsigned char is C++'s "one byte unsigned integer" by definition. Why don't you want a solution to your problem? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 1 '12 at 17:47
    
@jwodder: I don't know the intentions of the OP, but char is not necessarily unsigned. This may cause portability issues for values outside [0, 127] –  Matthieu M. Apr 1 '12 at 17:51
1  
No, you can't do a = a[0] + a[1];, believe me. –  Mr Lister Apr 1 '12 at 17:55
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5 Answers 5

Using char or unsigned char as 1 byte integer type is not always that straightforward... Sometimes you just need the type to be number type, not character type. One such example is here: 1 byte integer data type Other is when you have function overloaded for arguments of several different types.

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The output you're seeing from using cout << on an unsigned char is down to the mechanics of the << operator when used with a std::ostream (specifically, different overloads of the operator << will display the value in different ways - the char/unsigned char overloads usually assume that you want a character representation instead of a numeric one)

The underlying representation of your unsigned char is still the same number which you pushed into the vector - an unsigned char is still an unsigned 1-byte integer)

If you wish to change the output, then you need to avoid using the overload of the << operator which is designed for char or unsigned char - the easiest way to do that is to perform a cast

vector<unsigned char> v;
v.push_back(1);
v.push_back(2);

for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); i++)
    cout << static_cast<int>( v[i] );
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uint_least8_t is the most compact data type for storing a single decimal digit.

If your system supports a data type of size 1 byte, this will be it. Otherwise it will be the next smallest data type available.

You may need to cast the value when using a stream insertion operator to make sure you get numeric output instead of character treatment.

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Don't let the standard compiler type char confuse you; the following is perfectly legal:

char number[5] = { 1, 4, 3, 6, 2};   // Representation of decimal 14,362

It's not that there is anything special about the char type that forces you to think of them as characters; rather, it's is their convenient size of just 1 byte that makes them suitable to hold values that library routines such as printf use them to hold the 1-byte values that it will interpret as characters under a suitable encoding.

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Yeah, this was new to me. I though that I needed single-quotes around every char. Thanks for the tip! –  raze Apr 1 '12 at 18:00
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Yes, use unsigned char.

If <stdint.h> is available, then you could also use uint8_t.

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uint8_t is either one byte or a compile error. unsigned char may be larger than one byte (but only on systems where uint8_t is a compile error). –  Ben Voigt Apr 1 '12 at 18:09
1  
@Ben: unsigned char is always a "byte", but in C/C++ parlance, that "byte" may be more than 8 bits (though usually only on architectures that are considered unusual by today's standards). –  Ken Bloom Apr 1 '12 at 18:21
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