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The challenge:

My form contains 14 labels and a timer which runs continuously at an interval of 100ms. Within the timer there is code which interfaces with the file system and checks for the presence of a certain file. Depending on the existance of this file, a simple true or false, the labels have their background colours changed from gray to red and then back to gray if the condition is no longer met.

All OK so far. I can program that without issue and it works.

Now, also on this form are several buttons that I might need to click on at any time. However, there is a lag which makes the user experience seem like the form is occupied. I'm guessing this is due to the timer having to update the UI and therefore not able to fully "concentrate" on my click requests. I come from an IT support background and am just getting to grips with OOP and C# .NET so bare with me :) I am looking for a simple example that might help me get to grips with the basics of threading/independent execution or whatever the term might be. I appreciate there are lots of examples out there, but can one of you lovely people advise what I might need to do within context of my application?

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            timer1.Start();
        }

        private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (System.IO.File.Exists("C:\file.txt") == true)
            {
                label1.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
                //label2.BackColour..
                //label3.BackColour..
                //..                
            }
            if (System.IO.File.Exists("C:\file.txt") == false)
            {
                label1.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Gray;
                //label2.BackColour..
                //label3.BackColour..
                //..                
            }
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Do something
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What exactly is the question? –  svick Apr 1 '12 at 18:28
    
@svick I'm guessing it's more of a design one. Nathan are you up for a challenge, new technologies? –  NSGaga Apr 1 '12 at 19:04
    
Sure, always willing to try. –  Nathan Andrews Apr 1 '12 at 19:44

2 Answers 2

Use FileSystemWatcher instead of polling for the file on a Timer.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 yep, this is exactly what to do - when a file is detected, interate the buttons to find out which to change color. No latency-ridden, CPU-wasting, GUI-freezing polling. –  Martin James Apr 1 '12 at 19:50

The FileSystemWatcher suggested by David Nelson is a much better option, this is the quick and (very) dirty way:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private System.Threading.Timer timer1;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        this.timer1 = new System.Threading.Timer(state => {
            var fileExists = System.IO.File.Exists(@"C:\file.txt");

            this.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => {
                if (fileExists) {
                    label1.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
                    //label2.BackColour..
                    //label3.BackColour..
                    //..                
                }
                else {
                    label1.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Gray;
                    //label2.BackColour..
                    //label3.BackColour..
                    //..                
                }
            }));
        }, null, 0, 100);
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
System.Threading.Timer will call the delegate on a ThreadPool thread, which means you would be accessing controls on a non-UI thread, which will throw an exception. –  David Nelson Apr 2 '12 at 5:46
    
I tried running this code in VS11 in a WinForms project targetting .NET FW 4 and it worked. I KNEW it would throw exceptions, but it didn't. –  Jakub Hromadík Apr 2 '12 at 7:17
    
It so happens that BackColor can be set from a background thread without failing; however, that is an implementation detail that could change at any time. Setting any property on a WinForms control from a background thread COULD fail. –  David Nelson Apr 2 '12 at 22:04
    
Put the code in a call to BeginInvoke. –  Jakub Hromadík Apr 2 '12 at 22:57

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