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I am reading a code where it is supposed to implement a bit vector using a byte array.
The idea is that the bitvector has the bit set if a number is present at the corresponding position.
E.g. if number 10 is present the bit 10 must be set etc. It is a classic concept and I get it, but I am not sure about the actual implementation.

The part I don't get is:
bitvector [num / 8] |= 1 << (num % 8);

Where num is the number to set.
If num is 10 then the second byte must be used (num/8 ok so far) but 1 << (num % 8) does not set the second bit of the second byte as it should. Does it?

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closed as too localized by Robert Harvey Apr 1 '12 at 19:00

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3  
Why don't you print out 1 << (num % 8) and find out? – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '12 at 18:47
    
@OliCharlesworth:Now I feel like an idiot.I was too consumed thinking it is wrong to try this – Cratylus Apr 1 '12 at 18:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

10 % 8 = 2, therefore 1 << (10 % 8) = bit 2, or the value 4 (100 in binary)

(start counting bits from the right side of the byte, starting at zero). Very simple to verify:

7 -> 7 % 8 = 7, byte[0], Bit 7 (1 << 7).
8 -> 8 % 8 = 0, byte[1], Bit 0 (1 << 0).
9 -> 9 % 8 = 1, byte[1], Bit 1 (1 << 1).
10 -> 10 % 8 = 2, byte[1], Bit 2 (1 << 2).
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Why?It is 1 << 2 so 6 – Cratylus Apr 1 '12 at 18:51
    
<< is a bit shift operation. 1 << 2 is 4 (i.e. 2nd bit set). – Eugene Retunsky Apr 1 '12 at 18:52
    
Actually, it is the third bit. – Robert Harvey Apr 1 '12 at 18:52
    
1 << 2 == 4 (binary 100). – dasblinkenlight Apr 1 '12 at 18:53
    
Robert, it is the SECOND bit (0-based numeration, starts from 0th). – Eugene Retunsky Apr 1 '12 at 18:54

You're almost right: this code sets the third bit of the second byte. 10/8 == 1, and 10%8 == 2. Everything is off by one, so 10 means "bit number eleven", 1 means "second byte", hence setting the third bit of the second byte is correct for the argument of 10.

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I see now.I was thinking as the 10th bit, the actual 10 as you cound from left to right.E.g. First 8 bits and in the second byte the tenth is from left.But it is the opposite. – Cratylus Apr 1 '12 at 19:16

It does, if the "first" bit is the least-significant bit. That's a valid way of defining it. I assume you're thinking the first bit is the most-significant bit, in which case you need to shift by (7 - (num % 8)). You could do it that way too.

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