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In the contacts app on the iPhone if you enter a search term, then tap the "Search" button, the keyboard is hidden, BUT the cancel button is still enabled. In my app the cancel button gets disabled when I call resignFirstResponder.

Anyone know how to hide the keyboard while maintaining the cancel button in an enabled state?

I use the following code:

- (void)searchBarSearchButtonClicked:(UISearchBar *)searchBar
{
    [searchBar resignFirstResponder];
}

The keyboard slides out of view, but the "Cancel" button to the right of the search text field is disabled, so that I cannot cancel the search. The contacts app maintains the cancel button in an enabled state.

I think maybe one solution is to dive into the searchBar object and call resignFirstResponder on the actual text field, rather than the search bar itself.

Any input appreciated.

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9 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

try this

for(id subview in [yourSearchBar subviews])
{
    if ([subview isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]]) {
        [subview setEnabled:YES];
    }
}
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Thank you Malek! This works great! –  Christopher Apr 1 '12 at 23:08
    
See my note to Ben below. I decided to remove the code to access the internals in order to avoid any issues. Tapping the circle "x" in the search field re-enables the cancel button, and so hopefully it will not be an issue for users. –  Christopher Nov 18 '12 at 22:06
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As of iOS 6, the button appears to be a UINavigationButton (private class) instead of a UIButton.

I have tweaked the above example to look like this.

for (UIView *v in searchBar.subviews) {
    if ([v isKindOfClass:[UIControl class]]) {
        ((UIControl *)v).enabled = YES;
    }
}

However, this is obviously brittle, since we're mucking around with the internals. It also can enable more than the button, but it works for me until a better solution is found.

We should ask Apple to expose this.

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Thanks Ben! I ran some tests with my existing code and found that if I tap the circle "x" within the search field, the cancel button is re-enabled once again. This is on iOS 5.1. I have not yet converted to iOS 6. Therefore, I decided to remove the code to re-enable the cancel button as I want to avoid issues with accessing internals. As you say, it would be nice if the API allowed us direct access to this button. I plan to play safe for now :-) Thank you for posting. –  Christopher Nov 18 '12 at 22:04
    
I did a mixture of this approach with the additional delay – otherwise the setEnabled would not be recognized or overwritten internally... see stackoverflow.com/questions/8536625/uisearchbar-cancel-button –  ff10 Dec 12 '12 at 16:16
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This method worked in iOS7.

- (void)enableCancelButton:(UISearchBar *)searchBar
{
    for (UIView *view in searchBar.subviews)
    {
        for (id subview in view.subviews)
        {
            if ( [subview isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]] )
            {
                [subview setEnabled:YES];
                NSLog(@"enableCancelButton");
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

(Also be sure to call it anywhere after [_searchBar resignFirstResponder] is used.)

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The accepted solution will not work when you start scrolling the table instead of tapping the "Search" button. In that case the "Cancel" button will be disabled.

This is my solution that re-enables the "Cancel" button every time it is disabled by using KVO.

- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [super viewWillAppear:animated];

    // Search for Cancel button in searchbar, enable it and add key-value observer.
    for (id subview in [self.searchBar subviews]) {
        if ([subview isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]]) {
            [subview setEnabled:YES];
            [subview addObserver:self forKeyPath:@"enabled" options:NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew context:nil];
        }
    }
}

- (void)viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [super viewWillDisappear:animated];

    // Remove observer for the Cancel button in searchBar.
    for (id subview in [self.searchBar subviews]) {
        if ([subview isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]])
            [subview removeObserver:self forKeyPath:@"enabled"];
    }
}

- (void)observeValueForKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath ofObject:(id)object change:(NSDictionary *)change context:(void *)context
{
    // Re-enable the Cancel button in searchBar.
    if ([object isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]] && [keyPath isEqualToString:@"enabled"]) {
        UIButton *button = object;
        if (!button.enabled)
            button.enabled = YES;
    }
}
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This seemed to work for me (in viewDidLoad):

__unused UISearchDisplayController* searchDisplayController = [[UISearchDisplayController alloc] initWithSearchBar:self.searchBar contentsController:self];

I realize I should probably be using the UISearchDisplayController properly, but this was an easy fix for my current implementation.

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The cleanest solution for me –  user404709 Nov 18 '13 at 16:42
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Here's a slightly more robust solution that works on iOS 7. It will recursively traverse all subviews of the search bar to make sure it enables all UIControls (which includes the Cancel button).

- (void)enableControlsInView:(UIView *)view
{
    for (id subview in view.subviews) {
        if ([subview isKindOfClass:[UIControl class]]) {
            [subview setEnabled:YES];
        }
        [self enableControlsInView:subview];
    }
}

Just call this method immediately after you call [self.searchBar resignFirstResponder] like this:

[self enableControlsInView:self.searchBar];

Voila! Cancel button remains enabled.

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1  
Good solution. Works on both iOS 6 and 7. –  FeltMarker Oct 22 '13 at 9:13
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I expanded on what others here already posted by implementing this as a simple category on UISearchBar.

UISearchBar+alwaysEnableCancelButton.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface UISearchBar (alwaysEnableCancelButton)

@end

UISearchBar+alwaysEnableCancelButton.m

#import "UISearchBar+alwaysEnableCancelButton.h"

@implementation UISearchBar (alwaysEnableCancelButton)

- (BOOL)resignFirstResponder
{
    for (UIView *v in self.subviews) {
        // Force the cancel button to stay enabled
        if ([v isKindOfClass:[UIControl class]]) {
            ((UIControl *)v).enabled = YES;
        }

        // Dismiss the keyboard
        if ([v isKindOfClass:[UITextField class]]) {
            [(UITextField *)v resignFirstResponder];
        }
    }

    return YES;
}
@end
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I found a different approach for making it work in iOS 7.

What I'm trying is something like the Twitter iOS app. If you click on the magnifying glass in the Timelines tab, the UISearchBar appears with the Cancel button activated, the keyboard showing, and the recent searches screen. Scroll the recent searches screen and it hides the keyboard but it keeps the Cancel button activated.

This is my working code:

UIView *searchBarSubview = self.searchBar.subviews[0];
NSArray *subviewCache = [searchBarSubview valueForKeyPath:@"subviewCache"];
if ([subviewCache[2] respondsToSelector:@selector(setEnabled:)]) {
    [subviewCache[2] setValue:@YES forKeyPath:@"enabled"];
}

I arrived at this solution by setting a breakpoint at my table view's scrollViewWillBeginDragging:. I looked into my UISearchBar and bared its subviews. It always has just one, which is of type UIView (my variable searchBarSubview).

enter image description here

Then, that UIView holds an NSArray called subviewCache and I noticed that the last element, which is the third, is of type UINavigationButton, not in the public API. So I set out to use key-value coding instead. I checked if the UINavigationButton responds to setEnabled:, and luckily, it does. So I set the property to @YES. Turns out that that UINavigationButton is the Cancel button.

This is bound to break if Apple decides to change the implementation of a UISearchBar's innards, but what the hell. It works for now.

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Thanks Matt. I will try this when I get a chance. –  Christopher Feb 26 at 21:41
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for (UIView *firstView in searchBar.subviews) {
    for(UIView* view in firstView.subviews) {
        if([view isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]]) {
             UIButton* button = (UIButton*) view;
             [button setEnabled:YES];
        }
    }
}
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1  
Some explanation would be nice –  Jan Dvorak Mar 4 at 7:33
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