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I have a List of objects which are ordered. I would like to remove redundant objects where redundant does not necessarily mean duplicate. Here is an example:

List<Point> points = new List<Point>
{
   new Point(0, 10),
   new Point(1, 12),
   new Point(2, 16),
   new Point(3, 16),
   new Point(4, 16),
   new Point(5, 13),
   new Point(6, 16),
};

I am interested in removing the new Point(3, 16) entry because it doesn't provide useful information; I already know that the element at 2=16 and the element at 4=16. The information that 3=16 doesn't do me any good in my application (because I already have the bounds {2,4}=16), so I would like to remove that entry. I'd also like to not that I want to keep the 5th and 6th entry because there are not consecutive entries where Y=16.

Is there a slick way to do this with linq?

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1  
How do you determine "redundant" data? Is this in the form of a function of the form f = y(x)? You seem to be arbitrarily removing a data point. If your function is piecewise linear between two points a, b and f(a) = f(b) then you can remove it. But you seem to give no justification for removing this. –  Mike Bantegui Apr 1 '12 at 22:46
1  
Yes. If I have multiple consecutive points which determine a piecewise horizontal line, I want to remove the interior points and just leave the endpoints. –  Mark Apr 1 '12 at 22:48
    
@MikeBantegui - I think the sample + textual explanation are clear enough. Although some clarification about vertical and especially diagonal segments would help. –  Henk Holterman Apr 1 '12 at 22:56
    
Using Linq, I would get distinct Ys, Then Iterate points with the same Y after ordering them by X and find remove all but min and max. just a road map –  user915331 Apr 1 '12 at 22:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about this?

public void Test()
{
 List<Point> points = new List<Point>
 {
  new Point(0, 10),
  new Point(1, 12),
  new Point(2, 16),
  new Point(3, 16),
  new Point(4, 16),
  new Point(5, 13),
  new Point(6, 16),
 };
 var subSetOfPoints = points.Where(p=> !IsInTheMiddleX(p, points));
}

private bool IsInTheMiddleX(Point point, IEnumerable<Point> points)
{
 return points.Any(p => p.X < point.X && p.Y == point.Y) && 
        points.Any(p => p.X > point.X && p.Y == point.Y);                        
}
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Works good and better than my answer.. –  user915331 Apr 1 '12 at 23:25
    
@HaLaBi you should note that this doesn't actually remove the points from the list. Instead, it returns an enumerator that skips over these points. For many purposes, this is fine, but you need to keep in mind that the points variable continues to refer to the full list of points; at the end of the Test() method, it still contains seven items. –  phoog Apr 2 '12 at 0:53
1  
What about points at varying angles? This only accounts for points that are along the x-axis. –  m-y Apr 2 '12 at 0:59

Edit: This gives you the expected result. I'm grouping a List<Point>(ordered by Point.X) by Point.Y. Then i take the first and last Point in each group:

var result = points.OrderBy(p => p.X)
            .GroupBy(p => p.Y)
            .Select(grp =>
                grp.Where((p, index) => index == 0 || index == grp.Count() - 1))
                .SelectMany(p => p).OrderBy(p => p.X)
            .ToList();
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And now the more general y = ax + b case. Just for fun. –  Henk Holterman Apr 1 '12 at 23:11
    
wrong result... –  user915331 Apr 1 '12 at 23:19
    
@HenkHolterman: I'm not sure if this makes any sense at all since drawing with LINQ is not one of my strengths ;) I've edited my answer to simplify/accelerate it, meanwhile there was a version that was not working, but this should. –  Tim Schmelter Apr 1 '12 at 23:22
    
@TimSchmelter, I still see the point (4, 16) in the result which means its wrong.. sorry.. –  user915331 Apr 1 '12 at 23:24

I'd define your own class that wraps a List<Point> so that you can implement your own logic, defining what is "redundant" or other rules you wish to adhere to. It seems this would be more sane than using LINQ to handle this.

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Here is my try, It works fine but the code needs to be better:

 var distinctY = points.Select(p => p.Y).Distinct().ToList();

 List<Point> filtered = new List<Point>();
 foreach (var y in distinctY)
 {
     int minX, maxX;

     minX = points.Where(p => p.Y == y).Min(x => x.X);
     maxX = points.Where(p => p.Y == y).Max(x => x.X);

     filtered.Add(new Point(minX, y));

     if ( maxX != minX)      
        filtered.Add(new Point(maxX, y));
 }
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As the name LINQ indicates, it should be used only to Query the data.

If I were you I would not use LINQ to delete or modify the List. I use it only to Query it.

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instead of using List, you can use HashSet that use hash values to check duplicates. so you should override HashCode and Equals functions.

HashSet<Point> set=new HashSet<Point>();

... add values but don't forget to implement HashCode

 override int HashCode()
 {
     unchecked
     {
     // pick two odd numbers
     int x=17+this.x;
     int y=23+this.y;
     return x+y;

     }

 }
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but the OP is not looking for duplicates... –  Henk Holterman Apr 1 '12 at 23:09
    
@HenkHolterman so the implementation of hashcode will be different,or he could use IEquatable interface –  Sleiman Jneidi Apr 1 '12 at 23:12
    
@sleimanjneidi how would you solve the OP's problem with a different implementation of GetHashCode? –  phoog Apr 2 '12 at 0:54

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