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I am somewhat familiar to Java, but am using it more now for Android.

Anyway, I'm kind of wondering if the only way to instantiate a class variable in Java is to allocate it onto the heap.

For instance:

[C++ Land]
Foo foo;
foo.doSomeAwesomeStuff(9001);

[Java Land]
Foo foo = new Foo();
foo.doSomeAwesomeStuff(9001);

This kind of irks me because there are some things in Java where I just want a temporary variable like a placeholder Matrix, but I don't want to waste the system's heap by throwing garbage onto it.

I feel like this might be a call for the android-ndk then, but that feels too much like overkill.

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NDK call overhead would be much greater than a bit of heap usage. Java is optimized for the latter, after all. –  Seva Alekseyev Apr 1 '12 at 23:30
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The latter. :\

The HotSpot JIT compiler automatically tries to do this escape detection to a small extent, when it can detect that a stack allocation is safe, but you cannot control it in general -- you can only allocate on the heap.

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If the JRE doesn't think it's efficient to put the object on the heap, it won't. It doesn't have to actually do that, only act as if did. If the implementation has a native stack and the JRE can tell the object's lifetime is less than that of the stack frame, it can create on the stack if that is better. You don't have to micromanage that way, that's the JRE's job.

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There is no such thing as native stack in Java since there is a JVM with it's own memory manager between your application and HW. The answer is no.

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So do you feel this is a call for the NDK for me to use if I'm worried about things like this? –  DubyaDubyaDubyaDot Apr 1 '12 at 23:31
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@Ross I feel that if use Java, you shouldn't be worried about things like this. –  suddnely_me Apr 1 '12 at 23:35
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Your terminology needs tightening up for a start, before your question can be answered. Classes aren't variables, in any language, and they aren't instantiated. Class instances can be created and they can be referred to by variables, in various ways depending on the language. In C++ variables can refer to objects by value, and those variables can be static, or method-local, or instance variables of another class. C++ also has reference and pointer variables. Java only has pointer variables, where in this case 'pointer' is best understood in the Pascal sense rather than in the C/C++ sense, and specifically they can only refer to objects on the heap.

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Java's pointer variables are commonly referred to as reference variables if I'm not mistaken –  Eliezer Apr 2 '12 at 2:18
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@Eliezer In the JLS they are described as pointers which can have two kinds of value: null, or a reference. –  EJP Apr 2 '12 at 3:54
    
Always good to learn something new :-) –  Eliezer Apr 2 '12 at 4:18
    
@Eliezer That's why the exception is called NullPointerException, not NullReferenceException. –  EJP Apr 2 '12 at 4:27
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There is no "stack" per se, and definitely no destructors. You can instantiate classes in a method scope, but the JVM abstracts away the memory allocation method and the lifetime may persist far beyond the method's completion.

The idea is: do not worry about it.

Reality is: allocate sparingly, but acknowledge that you need to do it frequently.

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c has a stack and no destructors... –  Mooing Duck Apr 2 '12 at 0:29
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