Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a situation where I have an instanced class that needs to call a function from the enclosing class. The top class is generated code and compiled after the bottom class is. A consequence is the top class name is not known by the bottom class.

class topClass
{
  public:
    void topFunction();
    bottomCLass * bcInst;
}

class bottomClass
{
  void * owner;
  void someFunction() {owner->topFunction(); }
}

Obviously this won't work since there's no definition for topClass. How can I arrange this so the topClass function can be called from the bottomClass function? I tried using a parent class with a pure virtual function but this crashes when the function is called.

//This is defined and compiled with bottomClass
class classTemplate
{
  public:
    virtual void topFunction()=0;
}

class topClass : public classTemplate
{
  public:
    void topFunction();
    bottomClass * bcInst;
}

class bottomClass
{
  classTemplate * owner;
  void someFunction() {owner->topFunction();//Crashes here }
}

Is there a better way to solve this problem? The one thing I can't do is give bottom class the name/definition of top class, however the presence and name of topFunction is guaranteed.

share|improve this question
    
have a look at this link parashift.com/c++-faq/strange-inheritance.html#faq-23.4 where he talks about virtual functions and how to define them in such was that the baseclass will call the derived version. not too sure if this is what you want though.. –  chikuba Apr 1 '12 at 23:51
    
also, what do you mean "crashes". please specify what kind of crash we are talking about... the code you posted should be valid (with some minor issues) so could you eiter give more code or more crash report –  chikuba Apr 1 '12 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Move someFunction() implementation to CPP and include both headers in it. It will help you a lot:

topClass.h:

#ifndef TOPCLASS_H
#define TOPCLASS_H
#include "bottomClass.h"
class topClass
{
  public:
    void topFunction();
    bottomCLass * bcInst;
}
#endif

bottomClass.h:

#ifndef BOTTOMCLASS_H
#define BOTTOMCLASS_H
class bottomClass
{
  void * owner;
  void someFunction();
}
#endif

classes.cpp:

#include "topClass.h"
#include "bottomClass.h"

void bottomClass::someFunction() {owner->topFunction(); }`enter code here`
share|improve this answer
    
And of course somewhere void topClass::topFunction() {...} –  Shahbaz Apr 1 '12 at 23:47
    
@Shahbaz: since OP didn't implement topFunction inside class declaration, I guess he already did this :) –  suddnely_me Apr 1 '12 at 23:48
    
So you're saying I can compile only bottomClass::someFunction in a different compilation unit. One that includes the definition for topClass and it's members. –  user597225 Apr 1 '12 at 23:51
    
@Adam12 yes, that's right. It will help you to avoid incomplete type errors. –  suddnely_me Apr 2 '12 at 0:00
    
This worked in my testcase, but unfortunately there are many topClasses so this results in multiple definition errors for the bottomClass::someFunction() declaration. –  user597225 Apr 2 '12 at 1:38

You could make bottom a template:

struct topclass
{
    void topfunction();
    bottom<topclass> * bcInst;
    // ...
};

template <typename T>
struct bottom
{
    T * p;
    void somefunction() { p->topfunction(); }
};

Whether that's feasible depends on whether the relevant template definitions are visible in the right places, and if you want the code duplication. You could just make the bottom template a small component inside an otherwise fixed, single "bottom" class in some sort of type-erasing scheme.

share|improve this answer
    
that's scary... –  suddnely_me Apr 1 '12 at 23:47
    
I don't understand why you are trying to do something so simple with templates! –  Shahbaz Apr 1 '12 at 23:48
    
@Shahbaz maybe because it's possible? :) –  suddnely_me Apr 1 '12 at 23:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.