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I'm trying to setup a widget framework using jQuery, so I need to import java script by parsing the widget's xhtml and including in the framework page. The problem is that this may lead to pollution of the namespace. Is it possible to load java script into a namespace at runtime?

Perhaps there is some better method that I'm overlooking?

Thanks, Pete

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

AS Josh Stodola mentioned creating the variable at runtime isn't the problem

var holdsWidgetUUID = "widgetUUIDValue";
eval(holdsWidgetUUID + "= (" + data + ")");
alert(eval(holdsWidgetUUID));

Or if you prefer

var UUID = "widgetUUID";
var holdsWidgetUUID = "widgetUUIDValue";
window["widgets"] = new Array();
window["widgets"][holdsWidgetUUID] = data;
alert(window["widgets"][holdsWidgetUUID]);

The problem is getting the loaded javascript to work an be callable like dynamicvariablename.methodname()

I have a working solution if you force a certain coding practice upon the included javascript. Maybe this gets you in the right direction.

This is a widgets javascript (works.js). Notive that it's a javascript "class" with internally defined fields and methods. Which by itself keeps namespace pollution low and allows us the achieve the desired calling form x.getInfo()

function () {
    this.type = 1;
    this.color = "red";
    this.getInfo = function() {
        return this.color + ' ' + this.type + ' widget';
    };
}

And this is the file which includes it at runtime in a namespace

<html>
<head>
  <title>Widget Magic?</title>
  <script type='text/javascript' src='jquery.js'></script>
  <script type='text/javascript'>
    var UUID = "widgetUUID";
    var holdsWidgetUUID = "widgetUUIDValue";
    window["widgets"] = new Array();
    $.get("works.js", function(data) {
      window["widgets"][holdsWidgetUUID] = eval("(" + data + ")");
      $(document).ready(function() {
        window["widgets"][holdsWidgetUUID] = new (window["widgets"][holdsWidgetUUID])();
        alert(window["widgets"][holdsWidgetUUID].color);
        alert(window["widgets"][holdsWidgetUUID].getInfo());
      });
    });
  </script>
</head>
<body>
  <p>Just some stuff</p>
</body>
</html>
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This explanation helped me tremendously, thank you! This method is great for me since I get to specify the widget API. – slypete Jun 16 '09 at 20:48

You can do something like this...

var myOtherFramework = null;

$.get("myScript.js", function(data) {
  myOtherFramework = eval("(" + data + ")");
});

And then reference it like...

myOtherFramework.funcName();
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This is kind of what I'm doing; however, it won't work because I need to define the var myOtherFramwork's name at runtime. For example, the namespace of the javascript will need to be the UUID of the widget instance. I don't know that until runtime, unfortunately. – slypete Jun 15 '09 at 17:21
    
Well that's as simple as doing this: eval("placeUUIDhere = (" + data + ")"); – Josh Stodola Jun 15 '09 at 19:41

The javascript you load, should itself already be using unique namespaces.

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1  
Ideally. And the sky should also be green. But it's not. This is not a very helpful answer! – Josh Stodola Jun 15 '09 at 17:18

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