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I want to make sure that all 3 conditions result in the same answer before executing a control block:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

int main(){

    ///BUT THIS DOES NOT WORK!
    if ( (2 + 2) == (1 + 3) == (4 + 0) ){
        std::cout << "not executed" << std::endl;
    }

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Let's say those numbers are actually variables. This is what I have to do:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

int main(){

    int n1 = 2;
    int n2 = 2;
    int n3 = 1;
    int n4 = 3;
    int n5 = 4;
    int n6 = 0;

    int a = n1 + n2;

    ///this works
    if ( (n3 + n4) == a && (n5 + n6) == a){
        std::cout << "executed!" << std::endl;
    }

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

question: why does my first example not work?

I can assign multiple variables the same value like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

int main(){

    int a,b,c,d;
    a=b=c=d=9;

    ///prints: 9999
    std::cout <<a<<b<<c<<d<<'\n';

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

hoping someone can explain why this method of evaluating doesn't work.
It recently came to my attention while writing an if statement that determines if an nxn array is a magic square or not.

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It is always useful to specify what you mean by "it does not work". Does not compile? Produces an exception? Yields unexpected results? That are so many flavours of "it does not work". –  zespri Apr 2 '12 at 1:26
    
apologies. the program compiles but the condition always evaluates to false, and the control block is never executed. –  Trevor Hickey Apr 2 '12 at 1:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

(2 + 2) == (1 + 3) == (4 + 0)

First, (2 + 2) == (1 + 3) evaluates to true, because it really holds that 4 == 4.

Then, you're comparing true == (4 + 0). In this case, boolean values are casted to integers:

true -> 1
false -> 0

Therefore you're comparing 1 == 4, what results in false.

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makes sense, although I think (1 + 3) == (4 + 0) evaluates first –  Trevor Hickey Apr 2 '12 at 1:31
4  
@Xploit Take a look at this table en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/operator_precedence . Operator == is left-associative, therefore the expression is grouped as ((2 + 2) == (1 + 3)) == (4 + 0). –  Imp Apr 2 '12 at 1:35

This portion results in a boolean or integer, 0 or 1:

(2 + 2) == (1 + 3)

So the rest of the expression looks like:

1 == (4 + 0)

or

0 == (4 + 0)

Neither of these are correct.

The only operator that takes three arguments is the foo ? bar : baz operator. Everything else takes one or two arguments.

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