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Edit: I've got the solution and have described it a bit more at the end of the post

Using: MVC 3, C#

Problem: A key/value obj array sent to controller via $.post/$.ajax results in a 500 internal server error at the controller (because the value passed to the method in the C# controller is null)

I have an array that's in the format:

{
  "q_1": {
    "qid": "1",
    "tmr": 0
  },
  "q_2": {
    "qid": "2",
    "tmr": 0
  }
}

I get this via $("#myid").data() - and this is all fine.

I need to send this to my controller, and tried both post and $.ajax

var d = $("#q_data").data();
$.post("/run/submit", d, function(data) { alert(data);}, "application/json");

and

$.ajax({ 
           url: '/run/submit',
           data: d,
           contentType: 'application/json',
           dataType: 'json',
           success: function (data) { alert(data); }
           });

The method on the C# side is

 public ActionResult Submit(List<PerfObj> dict)
 {
      int x = dict.Count;
      return PartialView("_DummyPartial");
 }

Where PerfObj is my model

public class PerfObj
{
    public string id { get; set; }
    Perfvar perfVar;
}

public class PerfVar
{
    public string qid { get; set; }

    /* note I've tried both int and string for the tmr param */
    public string tmr { get; set; }
}

When I execute this, the call goes to the controller correctly - i.e. it hits the submit method. However, the method parameter dict, in

List<PerfObj> dict

is null.

Why? It seems to be something with my model, can't figure out how else to design it so it extracts the values correctly to the method parameter.

When I print the JSON.Stringify on the console, it shows the key/value pair correctly so I'm thinking it's going correctly to the server but the server/MVC3 doesn't like it for some reason or can't map it to the List of PerfObjs.

EDIT: Solution

Maciej's answer to my post was how I solved it. What I did eventually was to create a arrays of perfObj at the client side

$("#q_data").data(e,{key: e, perfVar: { qid: e, tmr: 0 }})

(ps - ignore redundant usage of 'e', I've got other plans, this is a dummy case)

And then I mapped it to a JSON friendly array

var arr = [];

$.each($('#q_data').data(), function (i, e) {
    var p = $(this).data(i);
    var obj = { key: i, perfVar: { id: e.perfVar.qid, tmr: e.perfVar.tmr}};
    arr.push(obj);
});

Then stringified it

var q = JSON.stringify(arr);

$.ajax'd it as described in Maciej's post.

I redefined my classes properly

public class PerfObj
{
    public string key { get; set; }
    public PerfVar perfVar { get; set; }
}

public class PerfVar
{
    public string id { get; set; }
    public int tmr { get; set; }
}

and changed the signature of my controller method

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Submit(PerfObj[] dict)
    {
        return PartialView("_DummyPartial");
    }

This now works perfectly and I can extend my classes fairly easily to do what I want.

Thank you all!

share|improve this question
    
If you're looking to bind an MVC model to JSON, try this: stackoverflow.com/questions/6405543/passing-json-list-to-mvc-3 –  Clay Apr 2 '12 at 3:42
    
@clay - thanks that was helpful –  jeremy Apr 2 '12 at 5:53
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are 3 things wrong with your code:

A. The property PerfVar must be made public and there must be a get and set on it:

public class PerfObj { public string id { get; set; } public Perfvar perfVar { get; set; } }

B. Your JSON representation of the list is incorrect. It should be:

 var e = [
               { "id": "foo", "perfVar": { "qid": "a", "tmr": "b"}}, 
               { "id": "foo", "perfVar": { "qid": "a", "tmr": "b"}}
           ];

C. You have to stringify the array and specify type: 'POST' to pass it to your MVC controller via ajax:

 $.ajax({
                url: '/run/submit',
                data: JSON.stringify(e),
                contentType: 'application/json, charset=utf-8',
                dataType: 'json',
                type: 'POST',
                success: function (data) { alert(data); }
            });
share|improve this answer
    
very clear explanation - worked like a charm. Coming to grips with JSON/MVC. Thanks and I've accepted the answer/upvoted. –  jeremy Apr 2 '12 at 5:52
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You can't directly map a key/value pair to a flat sequence. MVC has no idea how to do that.

You either need a custom model binder, or a better/easier option would be to change how you create the JSON on the client-side, so it actually matches up to your model.

Something like this:

var perfObjs = 
{
   { id: 1, perfVar: { qId: 1, tmr: 0 }},
   { id: 2, perfVar: { qId: 2, tmr: 0 }},
}
$.post("/run/submit", perfObjs, function(data) { alert(data);}, "application/json");
share|improve this answer
    
I agree with the second option here, why have inconsistent field names? If you keep them consistent it will be more readable and you won't need a custom model binder. –  Terry Apr 2 '12 at 3:53
    
@TerryB - agreed. But just wanted to give the OP the option of the model binder, in case he doesn't have control over the actual JSON on the client-side. Just covering all bases. –  RPM1984 Apr 2 '12 at 4:06
    
Good call. If that is the case though...client developers deciding on data structure?? Twilight zone!! (jk btw I know a lot of stuff comes from public APIs now) –  Terry Apr 2 '12 at 4:17
    
@TerryR - yeah, maybe could be using a plugin of some sort. But yeah, worst case you can re-hydrate the JSON. Model binder should be a last resort. –  RPM1984 Apr 2 '12 at 4:33
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Because the controller does not recognize the json value as List.

Why not just pass the raw string to your controller and let your controller convert the json string to object? that will be much more easier.

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