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Below is a upstart script for redis. How to I create a pid so I use monit for monitoring?

#!upstart
description "Redis Server"

env USER=redis

start on startup
stop on shutdown

respawn

exec sudo -u $USER sh -c "/usr/local/bin/redis-server /etc/redis/redis.conf 2>&1 >> /var/log/redis/redis.log"
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Why would you want to use monit when you have already specified respawn? –  auny Jul 29 '13 at 17:42
3  
@auny The reason to use monit in addition to upstart/respawn is that respawn is aware only of whether the process is alive or not, but it does not know whether the application is in a bad state or not. Monit on the other hand can interact with the application in different ways, for example hitting an http status endpoint, to handle the scenarios where the process may be running but the app is in a bad or broken state that would indicate the process needs to be restarted. –  Egg Nov 12 '13 at 23:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 49 down vote accepted

If start-stop-daemon is available on your machine, I would highly recommend using it to launch your process. start-stop-daemon will handle launching the process as an unprivileged user without forking from sudo or su (recommended in the upstart cookbook) AND it also has built in support for pid file management. Eg:

/etc/init/app_name.conf

#!upstart
description "Redis Server"

env USER=redis

start on startup
stop on shutdown

respawn

exec start-stop-daemon --start --make-pidfile --pidfile /var/run/app_name.pid --chuid $USER --exec /usr/local/bin/redis-server /etc/redis/redis.conf >> /var/log/redis/redis.log 2>&1

Alternatively you could manually manage the pid file by using the post-start script stanza to create it and post-stop script stanza to delete it. Eg:

/etc/init/app_name.conf

#!upstart
description "Redis Server"

env USER=redis

start on startup
stop on shutdown

respawn

exec sudo -u $USER sh -c "/usr/local/bin/redis-server /etc/redis/redis.conf 2>&1 >> /var/log/redis/redis.log"

post-start script
    PID=`status app_name | egrep -oi '([0-9]+)$' | head -n1`
    echo $PID > /var/run/app_name.pid
end script

post-stop script
    rm -f /var/run/app_name.pid
end script
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Am I missing something, or will the start-stop-daemon version never work correctly? Wouldn't Upstart track the PID of start-stop-daemon and assume the job had terminated when start-stop-daemon returned? This is the behavior I'm seeing in testing, and as far as I can tell, it's by design. –  cqcallaw Aug 17 '13 at 15:59
    
start-stop-daemon works like a transparent middle-man between upstart and the process specified in the --exec parameter of start-stop-daemon. All your upstart commands and PID monitoring should behave as if they were attached directly to the process in --exec. Could you provide some more information as to the kind of testing that seems to be producing different results? –  Egg Aug 27 '13 at 2:27
    
Do you have also to chown $USER to the pid file? –  José F. Romaniello Oct 28 '13 at 15:40
    
@JoséF.Romaniello No need, because upstart and monit both run as root and therefore should be able to access the pid file. Giving an unprivileged user access to the pid file sounds like a security concern and if you have that use case you may want to find a different way to solve the problem. –  Egg Nov 12 '13 at 23:09
1  
@CambridgeMike According to the upstart cookbook (linked in my reply) the setuid and setgid stanzas are only available in upstart 1.4+. Also they say for setuid: "Note that all processes (pre-start, post-stop, et cetera) will be run as the user specified." whereas s-s-d could target only a single process within your upstart script to be run as the nonprivileged user (edge case I think, but maybe someone might need this). setuid and s-s-d both solve the problem of forking from sudo or su, but most importantly for the OP's question, s-s-d provides PID management in addition. –  Egg Nov 6 at 19:19

Egg's 1st example with start-stop-daemon is way to go.

If You choose 2nd, I would suggest $$ to obtain the PID.

#!upstart
description "Redis Server"

env USER=redis

start on startup
stop on shutdown

respawn

script
    echo $$ > /var/run/app_name.pid
    exec sudo -u $USER sh -c "/usr/local/bin/redis-server /etc/redis/redis.conf 2>&1 >> /var/log/redis/redis.log"
end script

post-stop script
    rm -f /var/run/app_name.pid
end script
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