Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to verify in php that a string should not start or end with a hyphen (-). The allowed characters are a-z, A-Z, 0-9 and a hyphen anywhere in the middle of the string.

My this regex

/^[a-zA-Z0-9-]+$/

Verifies the occurrence of allowed character expect the condition that the string should not start or end with the hyphen. How do I achieve this? I new to regex.

share|improve this question
    
/^[a-zA-Z0-9_](.*)[a-zA-Z0-9_]$/ A rough approach. –  hjpotter92 Apr 2 '12 at 7:11
    
You have an underscore in your example but you don't mention it being allowed? –  MichaelRushton Apr 2 '12 at 7:23
    
@MichaelRushton : My error! Updated the regex. –  Rahul Apr 2 '12 at 7:30
    
Cool. See my answer below. Some of the others include the underscore. –  MichaelRushton Apr 2 '12 at 7:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should be what you need.

/^[a-z0-9]+([a-z0-9-]+[a-z0-9])?$/iD

Notice the D modifier. Without it the expression would match a string that ends in a new line. See here: http://blog.5ubliminal.com/posts/surprises-of-php-regexp-the-d-modifier/. Also, I've used the i modifier to not have to use [a-zA-Z0-9]. Keeps the expression shorter.

Here's a couple of examples. As the input string ends in a new-line, it should fail, but without the D modifier, even with the $ anchor, it passes:

// Outputs: int(1)
var_dump(preg_match('/^[a-z0-9]+([a-z0-9-]+[a-z0-9])?$/i', "aBc-d\n"));

// Outputs: int(0)
var_dump(preg_match('/^[a-z0-9]+([a-z0-9-]+[a-z0-9])?$/iD', "aBc-d\n"));
share|improve this answer
    
Thumbs up for that D modifier! –  Rahul Apr 2 '12 at 8:37

Use negative look ahead and look behind to achieve this

^(?!-)[a-zA-Z0-9-]+(?<!-)$

See it here on Regexr

^(?!-) is a negative look ahead assertion, ensures that it does not start with a dash

(?<!-)$ is a negative look behind assertion, ensures that it does not end with a dash

The advantage of the lookarounds is that they do not match a character, but just defining an assertion, that means your string can also have a length of 1, where the solution with explicitly requiring a non dash as first and last character makes a min length of 2.

Btw. a-zA-Z0-9_ is a predefined class \w so if you also want to allow the underscore you can change to:

^(?!-)[\w-]+(?<!-)$
share|improve this answer
    
Now that's a smart solution! –  Rahul Apr 2 '12 at 7:32

Verifies the occurrence of allowed character expect the condition that the string should not start or end with the hyphen. How do I achieve this? I new to regex.

Put simply: ~^[^-][a-z0-9-]+[^-]$~ should match. It says the first character can not be a -, then it says the middle part can only contain [a-z0-9-], and then it says the last character can't be a '-'. That said, you can also do this with substr, I don't think you actually need a regular expression.

With substr:

<?php
$valid = ((substr($str, 0, 1) != '-') && (substr($str, -1) != '-'));

EDIT: Didn't read the alphanumeric plus hyphen part, included it in the regex.

share|improve this answer
    
you forgot about a-z0-9 inside –  Artjom Kurapov Apr 2 '12 at 7:18
    
@ArtjomKurapov Yeah, I just noticed, updated the answer ;) –  Berry Langerak Apr 2 '12 at 7:19
    
What about the special characters in the middle of the string? the above snippet will just take care about the first and last character not being a hyphen. –  Rahul Apr 2 '12 at 7:20
    
@Rahul Again, I've just updated my answer. –  Berry Langerak Apr 2 '12 at 7:21
    
Your regex ~^[^-][a-z0-9-]+[^-]$~ would match $Foo;. –  stema Apr 2 '12 at 7:25

Use the substr method. something like:

if ((substr($str, 0, 1) != '-') && (substr($str, strlen($str)) != '-')){

It may also has a function similar to charAt in javascript but I don't remember it right now. (That will get you a more readable code)

share|improve this answer
    
What about the special characters in the middle of the string? the above snippet will just take care about the first and last character not being a hyphen. –  Rahul Apr 2 '12 at 7:21
    
@Rahul Well you already have a regular expression for that, so just combine the tow in a way that makes sense to you. –  Kahil Apr 2 '12 at 9:47

Try this:

/^[a-zA-Z0-9_]+[a-zA-Z0-9_-]*[a-zA-Z0-9_]+$/

"One or one of anything except the hyphen, then any number of anything including hyphen, then one or more anything except the hyphen".

EDIT: This will fail if the string is one character long. Sorry about that. But you get the idea... Split it into sub-regex's.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! This works exactly the way it should! Thanks! –  Rahul Apr 2 '12 at 7:19
    
Well, my string is made of 3 characters minimum, so that't not a problem :) –  Rahul Apr 2 '12 at 7:32
    
@Rahul you might wanna have a look at meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… :) –  SiGanteng Apr 2 '12 at 7:35

This isn't a regular expression per-se but works according to your requirements:

if(
   ctype_alnum($str[0]) && 
   ctype_alnum($str[strlen($str)-1]) && 
   strpos(substr($str, 1, strlen($str-1)), '-') !== false
) {
   echo 'a match';
}
share|improve this answer
    
A regular expression would be nice :) But thanks for your efforts... –  Rahul Apr 2 '12 at 7:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.