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I know that #define in C# lets you define a symbol to be used as the expression passed to an #if directive, and that the expression will evaluate to true.

But I can't think of any real use for this feature, do anyone knows a real use for it?

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6  
DEBUG comes to mind –  Marnix van Valen Apr 2 '12 at 7:18
    
Check this out link –  user683957 Apr 2 '12 at 7:18
3  
It's useless, it's just there for kicks. –  Mehrdad Apr 2 '12 at 7:24
    
@MarnixvanValen, please explain more –  Mohammed A. Fadil Apr 3 '12 at 6:43
    
@Hohinhime, sorry, this is not useful for me –  Mohammed A. Fadil Apr 3 '12 at 6:43

7 Answers 7

There simply aren't a whole lot of uses for it.

With #define you can only define constants for conditional compilation, and you would normally control these from the Build configurations.

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The most common use of a compile-time symbol is DEBUG which is defined by default through the Debug build configuration, not using a #define statement. In practice all compile-time symbols I've seen are defined through build configurations.

This is mostly due to the way source files are structured in C#. In C++ some header files (.h) typically contain a lot of #defines for things like platform dependent configuration. C# doesn't support including files into a source file. In addition, the (largely) platform independent nature of .NET eliminates the need for a lot of the defines required to make C++ code compile.

Further more, the scope of a symbol declared using #define is limited to the source file it is in. Effective use of a symbol throughout a project requires the #define to be repeated in all files it is used in, making it very hard to maintain consistency.

As Henk Holterman pointed out already, the only maintainable way to define a global compile-time symbol is through the build configuration because these symbols are defined once and available to all files in the project.

Having said that, #define can be useful to verify conditional compilation is working as expected. If you set a #define at the top of a .cs file in Visual Studio the active code will be highlighted and inactive code is greyed-out. You could also use it to enable debug-only code in a single file, for example while troubleshooting a problem.

So, to answer your question, there are no good uses I know of of the #define statement in C# in production code but it can be a handy tool for testing.

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#if DEBUG
    var jwriter = new VerboseJsonWriter(0);
#else
    var jwriter = new TerseJsonWriter();
#endif

The first one formats JSON in a pretty way, with indentations, everything on new line, etc. So that it's human readable for debugging.

The second one places everything in one line with no whitespace whatsoever, so that in production bandwidth is used optimally and things load quickly.

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3  
This answer doesn't show a use of #define –  Andrew Cooper Apr 2 '12 at 7:37
    
@AndrewCooper - those are usually passed from the build process, as already noted in Henk Holterman's answer. But this still does illustrate a use for such a symbol. –  Vilx- Apr 2 '12 at 7:50
1  
Yes, but the OP wasn't asking about the use of symbols, he was asking about we're you'd use the #define directive. –  Andrew Cooper Apr 2 '12 at 12:23
    
@AndrewCooper - To me it's not clear if the OP is asking about the #define, or where you use these symbols at all. –  Vilx- Apr 2 '12 at 12:47
    
@Vilx-, actually I am asking about both, that is why I said a real world example, for example "I used '#define' to define... which I used to... in my application" –  Mohammed A. Fadil Apr 3 '12 at 6:51

You could have a debug logger in your code which you don't want to use in your release code so you should use #define:

#if DEBUG_LOG
DebuggingTool.Activate();
#else
DebuggingTool.Deactivate();
#endif

And in VS 2010 you can add on the build tab conditional compilation symbols to add global symbols

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2  
No #define used or needed here. –  Henk Holterman Apr 2 '12 at 7:41
1  
I added a line below the code saying you should add the symbols from the build tab of project properties: Conditional compilation Symbols –  ionden Apr 2 '12 at 7:44
    
-1 this is an example of #if/#else - the question asks for a real world example of #define –  MattDavey Aug 3 '12 at 15:26

I can give you a warning as why NOT to use it.

If you use a tool like resharper that allows renaming it will not pick up renaming of variables etc if they are within a block that is not used by the current configuration but everything will compile.

So if you do a refactor for some code that has a condition that is applied in debug and then check it in as everything has compiled, it does not mean that code will compile in another mode such as release.

It may not be the end of the world as your build server would (should) pick it up, but as we all know, breaking the build means you owe beer to the rest of the team!

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#define as a preprocessor directive directly inserted in a C# source file is not of great utility. You could set a prepocessor variable in this way:

#define PRO_VERSION

Then, if you want to have two version of your application (a PRO paid version and a FREE version), you could encapsulate the code reserved to the PRO version with the prepocessor directive #if PRO_VERSION

...
#if PRO_VERSION 
    SomethingOnlyInProVersion(); 
#elif
    SomethingOnlyInFreeVersion(); 
#endif 
...


#if PRO_VERSION 
public void SomethingOnlyInProVersion()
{
}
#elif
public void SomethingOnlyFreeVersion()
{
}
#endif 

But all of this will fall short. If you want to compile your code without the PRO_VERSION you need to remove the #define because you cannot assign a value like in old C compiler (like #define PRO_VERSION = 0. Another problem of the directive is its visibility. The scope is limited to the current file. VisualStudio introduces the Configuration Manager just to resolve this kind of problems. There you can create different Configurations where each has its own set of symbols defined that could be checked and applied to the whole solution or to the individual projects without touching the source files.

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2  
This answer doesn't show a use of #define –  Andrew Cooper Apr 2 '12 at 7:37
2  
@AndrewCooper I have updated my answer. –  Steve Apr 2 '12 at 11:49
    
-1 the OP is asking for a real world example. –  MattDavey Aug 3 '12 at 15:25
    
@MattDavey, not sure to understand you, but very few of the answers here could be considered 'real world example'. At least I have provided a reason to use the directive. Could you enlighten me? –  Steve Aug 3 '12 at 15:28
    
@Steve I think the OP is asking for someones real world experience of having used #define "in the wild". A theoretical example of how it could be used doesn't provide much value over the MSDN documentation. –  MattDavey Aug 3 '12 at 15:34

I've only ever had one legitimate use for it, and that was for unit testing methods which had a Conditional attribute:

public class Foo()
{
    [Conditional("XYZ")]
    public void Bar()
    {
        // Something cool...
    }
}

I had to add the #define directive to be able to unit test the method:

#define XYZ
public class FooTests
{
    [Test]
    public void BarShouldDoSomethingCool()
    {
        var subject = new Foo();

        subject.Bar();

        // assert something cool happened
    }
}

Without the #define directive, the method would not have been called in the unit tests, resulting in either inconclusive or failing tests.

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