Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can i know the size of the enum Days? Will it be equal to 7*4(sizeof(int)) = 28 ??
The printf() here is giving me value 4, How can it be explained?

enum Days            
{
    saturday,       
    sunday ,    
    monday ,       
    tuesday,
    wednesday,     
    thursday,
    friday
} TheDay;
printf("%d", sizeof(enum Days));

Also we can use this as (enum Days)(0), which is similar to the integer array.If size is equal to 4 then how this array kind of behavior can be explained ?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In C all enums are most of the time integers of type int, which explains why sizeof(Days) == 4 for you.

To know how many values are in an enum you can do something like this:

enum Days            
{
    saturday,
    sunday,
    monday,
    tuesday,
    wednesday,
    thursday,
    friday,
    NUM_DAYS
};

Then NUM_DAYS will be the number of enumerations in Days.

Note that this will not work if you change the values of an enumeration, for example:

enum Foo
{
    bar = 5,
    NUM_FOO
};

In the above enum, NUM_FOO will be 6.

share|improve this answer
2  
Your answer has the benifit of doubt since you said most of the time* integers of type int*. However, the precise answer is that the size is **Imlpementation Defined. –  Alok Save Apr 2 '12 at 7:39
2  
Actually most of the time with gcc it is unsigned int. –  ouah Apr 2 '12 at 7:45
1  
Though on all sane compilers, sizeof(int) == sizeof(unsigned int)... –  Jonathan Grynspan Apr 2 '12 at 7:47
    
+1 for the explanation on how to figure out the amount of items in the enum, that's what the OP probably needed. –  littleadv Apr 2 '12 at 7:59
    
Thathas the minor flow of a warning about "enumeration value not handled", e.g. when switching the enumerated type (enum Foo bar; switch (bar) { };. Which of cause can be handled with an empty case or sensibly default: case. –  con-f-use Apr 8 at 12:26

It is implementation dependent. An enum is only guaranteed to be large enough to hold integer values.

Reference:
C99 Standard 6.7.2.2 Enumeration specifiers

Constraints
2 The expression that defines the value of an enumeration constant shall be an integer constant expression that has a value representable as an int.
...
4 Each enumerated type shall be compatible with char, a signed integer type, or an unsigned integer type. The choice of type is implementation-defined,128) but shall be capable of representing the values of all the members of the enumeration. The enumerated type is incomplete until immediately after the } that terminates the list of enumerator declarations, and complete thereafter.

share|improve this answer
    
The real question is why its 4 and not 28, you're not answering that. I think Joachim's answer is much more to the point as he explains what the OP actually needed to know. –  littleadv Apr 2 '12 at 7:57
    
no actually, I explained exactly why I downvoted your answer. You may be correct in what you quote, but that's not what the OP needs or asks for. I corrected my answer per your comments, please grow up and do the same. –  littleadv Apr 2 '12 at 8:04
1  
@littleadv: I will not modify this answer one bit because it exactly answers what the OP asked for.You should read again what the Q asks.The answer precisely answers that and if you cant see that then this downvote is nothing but malicious revenge noise.You had to correct your answer because it was incorrect, this answer wont change because it is correct, And I dare anyone to prove me otherwise.Be happy with your downvote.This conversation for me is over unless you take up the dare of proving this answer incorrect.. –  Alok Save Apr 2 '12 at 8:47
    
I actually have read the question, and the OP is clearly in need of explanation what "enum" is. Quoting standards will NOT help. If you cannot understand that - I really feel sorry for you. Deeply. I really don't understand why you cannot actually address the criticism instead of fighting the critic. You asked me to read your answer, so I did, and shed my opinion on it. –  littleadv Apr 2 '12 at 9:06

In C, an enum type is an implementation defined integer type that can represent all the enum constants in the enum.

With gcc if there no negative value in the enum constants, the implementation defined type is unsigned int otherwise it is int.

http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Structures-unions-enumerations-and-bit_002dfields-implementation.html

An enum type should not be confused with the enum constants. Enum constants are of type int.

share|improve this answer

enum is usually sized as int. Its a type, not an array or struct, so I don't understand why you expect it to be 28.

share|improve this answer
    
@littleadv We can use (enum Days)(0) . So i thought this is something like an array, hence the doubt –  abhi Apr 2 '12 at 8:38
    
@abhi (enum Days)(0) is casting. Array indexes are marked with [], not (). –  littleadv Apr 2 '12 at 9:07
    
@littleadv : ok got it . thank u very much –  abhi Apr 2 '12 at 9:12
    
@abhi you're very welcome. –  littleadv Apr 2 '12 at 9:14

With the compiler I am using right now, the sizeof(enum) depends on the biggest value stored. If all enum values are <= 0xFF then the size is 1 byte, but if there is a value 0x100 then the size will by 2 bytes... Just adding values in the enum can change the result of sizeof(MyEnum)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.