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I get this code from a book but i could not get it work. What is my problem here? As the title says

"No previous prototype for function BOOL areIntsDifferent (int thing1, int thing2 ) and NSString * boolString (BOOL yesNo)"

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

BOOL areIntsDifferent (int thing1, int thing2 ) {
    if ( thing1 == thing2) {
        return (NO);
    }
    else {
        return (YES);
    }
}    

NSString * boolString (BOOL yesNo) {
    if (yesNo== NO) {
        return (@"NO");
    }
    else {
        return (@"YES");
    }    
} 

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    BOOL aretheydiffrent;
    aretheydiffrent = areIntsDifferent (5,5);
    NSLog(@"are %d and %d diffrent? %@", 5, 5, boolString(aretheydiffrent));
    aretheydiffrent = areIntsDifferent(23,42);
    NSLog(@"are %d and %d diffrent? %@", 23, 42, boolString(aretheydiffrent));
    return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The error message translates to:

This means that GCC found a global function definition without seeing a prototype for the function. If a function is used in more than one file, there should be a prototype for it in a header file somewhere. This keeps functions and their uses from getting out of sync

Making the functions static should sort this out:

#import < Foundation/Foundation.h >

static BOOL areIntsDifferent (int thing1, int thing2 )
{
     return thing1 != thing2;
}

static NSString * boolString (BOOL yesNo)
{
    return yesNo ? @"YES" : @"NO";

}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])

{
   BOOL aretheydiffrent;

   aretheydiffrent = areIntsDifferent (5,5);

   NSLog(@"are %d and %d diffrent? %@",
      5, 5, boolString(aretheydiffrent));

   aretheydiffrent = areIntsDifferent(23,42);

   NSLog(@"are %d and %d diffrent? %@",
      23, 42, boolString(aretheydiffrent));

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
How is it that I run the exact same code the OP posted (without the static definitions) in Xcode 4.3 and it worked flawlessly? –  Dr.Kameleon Apr 2 '12 at 8:26
1  
Different compiler? The OP doesn't state which one he's using. –  trojanfoe Apr 2 '12 at 8:26
1  
@Dr.Kameleon XCode 4.3 uses CLang, not GCC –  hamstergene Apr 2 '12 at 8:27
    
@hamstergene Thanks for the clarification, coz I started wondering myself... –  Dr.Kameleon Apr 2 '12 at 8:28
    
why i need the static? and what does it do?? i don't understand. –  John Yap Apr 2 '12 at 8:32

First we should not use static, secondly we should not use '==' in objective c(oc), when we use bool, because in oc, numbers are written in internal storage like this 0000 0000, so '5' read as0000 00021, and '23'read as '0001 0111' '42' in oc, computer could think 23 as 5, which is wrong. For the same reason we shouldn't use == yes

Here is an example:

NSLog(@"%d  %d",YES,NO);
if(areIntsDifferent_faulty(23, 5)==YES)
{
   NSLog(@"Are %d and %d different? %d YES",23,5,areIntsDifferent_faulty(23, 5));
}
else {
    NSLog(@"Are %d and %d different? %d NO",23,5,areIntsDifferent_faulty(23, 5));
}

if(areIntsDifferent_faulty(23, 5))
{
    NSLog(@"Are %d and %d different? %d YES",23,5,areIntsDifferent_faulty(23, 5));
}
else {
    NSLog(@"Are %d and %d different? %d NO",23,5,areIntsDifferent_faulty(23, 5));
}

Output: are 5 and 5 different? no are 23and 42 different? yes 1 0 are 23 and 5 different? 18 no are 23 and 5 different? 18 yes

so write like this :if(areIntsDiffreent_faulty(23,5))this is right!

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Can you please clarify what you mean? agree with you that static is not necessary, but use == in objective-c is correct for BOOL comparison. –  Saphrosit Sep 22 '12 at 22:42

A function prototype is essentially the "signature" of the function: what is its name, what does it return, what are its arguments, etc. A function body is what the function actually does, and is what's contained between the braces of a function.

Prototype:

BOOL areIntsDifferent(int thing1, int thing2);

Body:

BOOL areIntsDifferent(int thing1, int thing2)
{
    return (thing1 != thing2);
}

You are most likely receiving just a compilation warning, rather than an error (warnings just tell you something and your program might still work, errors actually stop the show). Function prototypes are very useful in larger projects, and are typically contained in a separate file called the header. I don't know which book you have, but you'll probably read more about this later on.

There are two possible fixes:

  • Add the following lines to the top of the file, after #import ...

    BOOL areIntsDifferent(int thing1, int thing2);
    NSString* boolString(BOOL yesNo);

  • Turn off the "Missing Function Prototypes" warning in your Xcode project config settings.

The first fix is actually adding the function prototypes to the top of file, which satisfies the warning. The second fix is actually disabling the warning so the compiler won't bring it up.

The first fix is something like "I hear you, thanks for reminding me, Mr. Compiler." The second fix is something like "Shut up compiler, I'm a big boy and have my functions right where I want them!"

share|improve this answer
    
The book title is Learn Objective-C on the Mac. Publisher Apress. –  John Yap Apr 2 '12 at 8:51
    
Yes I imagine they will probably introduce you to header files later on. Header files are a way for you to tell other people what functions you have available (by only giving them the prototypes), but keeping the function body to yourself (to protect how your super secret function works, etc.) For now, either add the prototype to the top of the file, or disable the warning :) –  inspector-g Apr 2 '12 at 8:54
    
I do understand the concept of functions in c++. and I gave some thought of it. Now is clear to me. Thank you! @inspecto g. –  John Yap Apr 2 '12 at 8:55
    
but i am not good in classes in any language. Still I am confuse with the header files and the .h thing. Glad you guys can help me!. –  John Yap Apr 2 '12 at 8:58

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