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If I run the function below before defining it, I will get this error...

Uncaught ReferenceError: openModal is not defined

run then define

$(document).ready( function() {

    delay(openModal, 2000);

    delay = function (f, t) {
        setTimeout(function() {
            f();
        }, t);
    };

    openModal = function () {
        $('#modal-box').css( {
            left: $(window).width() / 2 - $('#modal-box').width() / 2,
            top: $(window).height() / 2 - $('#modal-box').height() / 2
        } );
        $('#modal-box').show();
        $('#modal-mask').show();
    };  

});

Now if I define the function first and then call it it works...I have a background in PHP so I am used to being able to access functions globally, am I doing something wrong or do all functions have to be defined before they can be used?

$(document).ready( function() {

    delay = function (f, t) {
        setTimeout(function() {
            f();
        }, t);
    };

    openModal = function () {
        $('#modal-box').css( {
            left: $(window).width() / 2 - $('#modal-box').width() / 2,
            top: $(window).height() / 2 - $('#modal-box').height() / 2
        } );
        $('#modal-box').show();
        $('#modal-mask').show();
    };  

    delay(openModal, 2000);

} );
share|improve this question
    
Is that everything, i.e. have you declared the identifier openModal (as opposed to defining it) above that scope? e.g. var openModal; – Rup Apr 2 '12 at 8:59
2  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/261599/… – TJHeuvel Apr 2 '12 at 8:59
    
@Rup that is the first time openModal is used – JasonDavis Apr 2 '12 at 8:59
up vote 21 down vote accepted

When you assign a function to a variable, you have to assign it before you can use the variable to access the function.

If you declare the function with regular syntax instead of assigning it to a variable, it is defined when code is parsed, so this works:

$(document).ready( function() {

    delay(openModal, 2000);

    function openModal() {
        $('#modal-box').css( {
            left: $(window).width() / 2 - $('#modal-box').width() / 2,
            top: $(window).height() / 2 - $('#modal-box').height() / 2
        } );
        $('#modal-box').show();
        $('#modal-mask').show();
    };  

});

(Note the difference in scope, though. When you create the variable openModal implicitly by just using it, it will be created in the global scope and will be available to all code. When you declare a function inside another function, it will only be available inside that function. However, you can make the variable local to the function too, using var openModal = function() {.)

share|improve this answer

Move the function definition outside of the document.ready block, and things will work as you expect. In javascript (as in most languages), you must define a function or variable before making a reference to it.

In your first example, you reference openModal in the call to delay(), but javascript has no way of knowing what openModal is yet.

openModal = function () {
    $('#modal-box').css( {
        left: $(window).width() / 2 - $('#modal-box').width() / 2,
        top: $(window).height() / 2 - $('#modal-box').height() / 2
    } );
    $('#modal-box').show();
    $('#modal-mask').show();
};

$(document).ready( function() {
    delay(openModal, 2000);
});

edit:

TJHeuvel points out that function does some trickery to define functions before anything else is executed in the same block: Why can I use a function before it's defined in Javascript?

share|improve this answer
3  
What's the point of defining the function outside? "you must define a function [...] before making a reference to it": Not necessarily. Since function declarations are hoisted, you can define them anywhere and other code in the current scope can call it. Only function expressions can be called after they have been assigned. – Felix Kling Apr 2 '12 at 9:04
    
Note that what TJHeuvel points out doesn't apply when you assign a function to a variable. Even if the function object itself is created when the code is parsed, it's assigned to the variable at runtime. – Guffa Apr 2 '12 at 9:13

In short yes you do have to define it before using a function, but you could use the setTimeout function for your delay which takes a string as the code to exectute:

$(document).ready( function() {

    setTimeOut('openModal()', 2000);

    openModal = function () {
        $('#modal-box').css( {
            left: $(window).width() / 2 - $('#modal-box').width() / 2,
            top: $(window).height() / 2 - $('#modal-box').height() / 2
        } );
        $('#modal-box').show();
        $('#modal-mask').show();
    };  

});

this would work as the function is not called until after it is defined.

share|improve this answer
2  
Your first suggestion does not work, since at the moment you call ` delay(openModal, 2000), openModal` is still holding a reference to the empty function. The real function is only assigned afterwards, but it does not affect the value you already passed. Your second suggestion only works "by mistake". Since openModal is not declared with var, it is global. But as soon as you declare it properly with var, it won't work anymore, since setTimeout evaluates strings in global scope (and openModal would be local to the ready event handler). – Felix Kling Apr 2 '12 at 9:06
    
ok thanks. edited – Richard Apr 2 '12 at 9:08

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