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[Apologies if I double post this - I thought I posted a question last friday but my account doesn't show any questions asked.]

The main problem: Oracle 11g on Linux alternates between completing and returning data for one particular query in 4 seconds and 1.000 seconds. Oracle switches back and forth between two different execution plans, one of which is catastrophically slow.

We have identified several semantically identical changes to the query which makes Oracle constantly choose the fast execution plan. We are afraid of a bug or data corruption because of the switching back-and-forth for no apparent reason.

Any ideas as to the cause of this behaviour would be greatly appreciated.

Here are the gritty details:

We have a quite simple Oracle query towards four simple tables of a schema. We get drastically different execution times when we run this query - if we run it 20 times in sequence, three or four of the executions take 4 seconds to return the data, the other executions takes more than 1.000 seconds.

We have tried logging the execution plans, and Oracle alters between two different execution plans - one plan gives the 4 second response and the other gives the 1.000+ second response.

The tables are about 30.000 rows each, and the response is rouglhy 5.000 rows. When Oracle chooses the slow execution plan, the time to fetch each result row gets exponentially slower - the first 1.000 lines of the response comes in 2 seconds, lines 1.000-2.000 take 30 seconds, lines 2.000-3.000 take 90 seconds, and so on.

We have indexes on the columns used, and for the fast execution plan they are used as expected. The slow plan always does a "FAST FULL SCAN" of one of the indexes (at a cost of about 2.000) as opposed to the fast plan, which does a "RANGE SCAN" of the same index (at a cost of about 2). The plans are entirely different - maybe because of this. We have tried DROP:ing this index and re-CREATE:ing it, but no difference on the outcome.

Additionally, the query includes a NOT LIKE on a primary key column in one of the tables. If we move these NOT LIKE expressions to instead be against a referencing column, Oracle always chooses the fast execution plan.

We do no want to lock an execution plan, since the query is expected to change subtly. Also, this altering back and forth between execution plans has us worried - it smells of bugs or broken data.

Does anyone have any ideas why Oracle might behave in this way? Is there a way around it, other than locking in execution plans?

Here is the query that alters between a fast and a slow execution plan:

select g.ucid, a.ucid
from account a, groups g, group_members gm, group_groups_flat ggf
where a.ucid = gm.ucid_member
and gm.ucid_group = ggf.ucid_member
and ggf.ucid_group = g.ucid
and a.status = 'active'
and g.unix_gid is not null
and gm.valid_from <= sysdate
and gm.valid_to >= sysdate
and g.ucid not like '$_%' escape '$'
and g.ucid not like 's$_%' escape '$'

If I do the NOT LIKE on the referencing column rather than the primary key column, the query is always fast:

select g.ucid, a.ucid
from account a, groups g, group_members gm, group_groups_flat ggf
where a.ucid = gm.ucid_member
and gm.ucid_group = ggf.ucid_member
and ggf.ucid_group = g.ucid
and a.status = 'active'
and g.unix_gid is not null
and gm.valid_from <= sysdate
and gm.valid_to >= sysdate
and ggf.ucid_group not like '$_%' escape '$'
and ggf.ucid_group not like 's$_%' escape '$'

If i remove the restricitons on the account table ("a.status = 'active'") or the groups table ("g.unix_gid is not null") the query is always fast, but of course returns more rows. It does, however, return 30.000 rows in a quite constant 10 seconds (as opposed to 5.000 rows in 1.000 seconds for the slow execution plan of the more restricted query).

The relevant parts of the schema involved in the query is:

CREATE TABLE "PDB"."GROUPS"
(
  "UCID"        VARCHAR2(256 BYTE),    
  "UNIX_GID"    NUMBER(*,0),
  [...]

  PRIMARY KEY ("UCID") USING INDEX PCTFREE 10 INITRANS 2 MAXTRANS 255 COMPUTE STATISTICS STORAGE(INITIAL 3145728 NEXT 1048576 MINEXTENTS 1 MAXEXTENTS 2147483645 PCTINCREASE 0 FREELISTS 1 FREELIST GROUPS 1 BUFFER_POOL DEFAULT FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT CELL_FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT) TABLESPACE "PDB" ENABLE,

  CONSTRAINT "GN_FK" FOREIGN KEY ("UCID") REFERENCES "PDB"."NAMESPACE" ("UCID") ENABLE
)
CREATE TABLE "PDB"."ACCOUNT"
(
  "UCID"           VARCHAR2(256 BYTE),
  "STATUS"         VARCHAR2(10 BYTE) NOT NULL ENABLE,
  [...]

  PRIMARY KEY ("UCID") USING INDEX PCTFREE 10 INITRANS 2 MAXTRANS 255 COMPUTE STATISTICS STORAGE(INITIAL 2097152 NEXT 1048576 MINEXTENTS 1 MAXEXTENTS 2147483645 PCTINCREASE 0 FREELISTS 1 FREELIST GROUPS 1 BUFFER_POOL DEFAULT FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT CELL_FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT) TABLESPACE "PDB" ENABLE,

  FOREIGN KEY ("STATUS") REFERENCES "PDB"."ACCOUNT_STATUS" ("STATUS") ENABLE,
  CONSTRAINT "AN_FK" FOREIGN KEY ("UCID") REFERENCES "PDB"."NAMESPACE" ("UCID") ENABLE,
)
CREATE TABLE "PDB"."GROUP_MEMBERS"
(
  "UCID_GROUP"  VARCHAR2(256 BYTE) NOT NULL ENABLE,
  "UCID_MEMBER" VARCHAR2(256 BYTE) NOT NULL ENABLE,
  "VALID_FROM" DATE NOT NULL ENABLE,
  "VALID_TO" DATE NOT NULL ENABLE,
  CONSTRAINT "GROUP_MEMBERS_GROUPS_FK1" FOREIGN KEY ("UCID_GROUP") REFERENCES "PDB"."GROUPS" ("UCID") ENABLE,
  CONSTRAINT "GROUP_MEMBERS_MEMBER_FK1" FOREIGN KEY ("UCID_MEMBER") REFERENCES "PDB"."ACCOUNT" ("UCID") ENABLE
)
CREATE INDEX "PDB"."IDX_GROUP_MEMBERS_FROM" ON "PDB"."GROUP_MEMBERS"("VALID_FROM")
CREATE INDEX "PDB"."IDX_GROUP_MEMBERS_TO" ON "PDB"."GROUP_MEMBERS"("VALID_TO")
CREATE TABLE "PDB"."GROUP_GROUPS_FLAT"
(
  "UCID_GROUP"  VARCHAR2(256 BYTE),
  "UCID_MEMBER" VARCHAR2(256 BYTE),
  CONSTRAINT "GROUP_GROUPS_FLAT_GROUPS_FK1" FOREIGN KEY ("UCID_GROUP") REFERENCES "PDB"."GROUPS" ("UCID") ENABLE,
  CONSTRAINT "GROUP_GROUPS_FLAT_GROUPS_FK2" FOREIGN KEY ("UCID_MEMBER") REFERENCES "PDB"."GROUPS" ("UCID") ENABLE
)
CREATE INDEX "PDB"."IDX_GROUP_GROUPS_FLAT_GROUP" ON "PDB"."GROUP_GROUPS_FLAT("UCID_GROUP")
CREATE INDEX "PDB"."IDX_GROUP_GROUPS_FLAT_MEMBER" ON "PDB"."GROUP_GROUPS_FLAT("UCID_MEMBER")
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You did ask this before, but on Database Administrators - your question is here. Your accounts don't appear to be linked. That's probably the more appropriate forum, for this kind of question. –  Alex Poole Apr 2 '12 at 10:53

2 Answers 2

The information you've provided has some inconsistencies. In this question, you say that one plan uses a FAST FULL SCAN while the other uses a RANGE SCAN on the same index; but in the version of the question on the dbas site, you show the actual execution plans, and both use a FAST FULL SCAN as the only index-based operation. The real difference between the two plans seems to be the join order, where the second order requires some larger in-memory operations to take place due to a lack of join conditions between the first tables to be joined.

Anyway, I have a couple of suggestions for how to investigate this further. One idea is to activate tracing event 10053, which logs all of the optimizer activity, and see if you can compare the results from runs that get the two different plans. The output is not very pretty and can be hard to understand, but it might give you some idea of what is going on.

My other thought is that the only non-literal value you are using in the query at all is SYSDATE, so I wonder if changes in the time are causing the optimizer's arithmetic to change, producing the different plans. I am not sure how the optimizer deals with SYSDATE. You might try replacing the calls to SYSDATE with a bind variable, and setting the date value in other code before executing the query.

share|improve this answer
    
Apologies about the inconsistencies. I've had my head stuck into this issue for five days running - the RANGE SCAN was in fact the plan that was generated in an identical schema (but with less data) in the same Oracle instance. The idea about SYSDATE was very interesting. I have tried replacing the SYSDATE with a TO_DATE() literal, but it unfortunately did not affect the outcome. Still altering back and forth between efficient and horrible. –  Viktor Fougstedt Apr 3 '12 at 13:35

If you are using 11g you can use Plan Management to stop Oracle from switching plans.

http://www.oracle-base.com/articles/11g/sql-plan-management-11gr1.php

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