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i am trying a piece of code.

<?php
$tmp = ord('F'); //gives the decimal value of character F (equals 70)
$tmp = $tmp - 55; //gives 15 - decimal equivalent of 0x0F
$tmp = dechex($tmp); // converts 15 to 0x0F
$fp = fopen("testing.data","wb+");
fwrite($fp,$tmp);
fclose($fp);
?>

When i open the file called testing.data in a hex editor, i see 2 bytes written. The 2 bytes are 0x36 and 0x33. I am expecting that only 1 byte i.e. 0x0f will be written to the file. This doesn't happen. Please help me out with this.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to write the byte 0x0f to the file, simply write the character with that ASCII code. You effectively want to undo ord, and the reverse function is chr:

<?php
$tmp = ord('F'); //gives the decimal value of character F (equals 70)
$tmp = $tmp - 55; //gives 15 - decimal equivalent of 0x0F
$tmp = chr($tmp); // converts 15 to a character
$fp = fopen("testing.data","wb+");
fwrite($fp,$tmp);
fclose($fp);
?>
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2  
+1 chr is easier and does the job here. pack is more versatile though and allows transforming of multi-byte values with a specified byte order format (little-endian, big-endian, etc.). – knittl Apr 2 '12 at 9:36
    
Thanks a lot! :-) i was trying exact opposite. – user1051505 Apr 2 '12 at 9:50

You are writing the string representation of the number 0x0F to the file (which will use 1 byte per character).

In PHP you would use the pack function to create binary strings.

$bindata = pack('n', 0x0F);
file_put_contents('testing.data', $bindata);
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