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I'm using WebClient to get some JSON data from server. And I want it to be synchronous (yes, i know that in WP everything should be async, but i need it sync from some reason). In my class, i have code like this:

    private WebClient _webClient;
    private string _acctualResponse;
    private AutoResetEvent _lock = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    void _webClient_UploadStringCompleted(object sender, UploadStringCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        _acctualResponse = e.Result;
        _lock.Set();
    }

    public string _message;
    public string SendString(string URL, string message)
    {
        _webClient.UploadStringAsync(new Uri(URL), message);
        _lock.WaitOne();
        return _acctualResponse;    
    }

In my program, I'm using it to get a few different data set. And everything works OK, while return data is small. When i have to get bigger data (3 img in base64), events is not start. BUT! when I removed _lock, event always start a moment after SendString function is over. I try to using some other mechanisms to wait for response, e.g. while loop:

    private void WaitForResponse()
    {
        _acctualRequestTime = 0;
        _acctualResponse = null;
        while (!_uploadComplet && _acctualRequestTime < Timeout)
        {
            int slepTime = 200;
            Thread.Sleep(slepTime);
            _acctualRequestTime += slepTime;
        }
        _uploadComplet = false;
    }

[of course, in event i was setting _uploadComplete flag to true] Efect was the same: response came a short after timeout, no matter what timeout interval was set. I'm a bit confused by this situation. Do you know what i'm doing bad?

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You're railing against the expected async design philosophy, but you don't say why. Perhaps you could write up your reason for that, and we could give you an answer that solves your problem but doesn't require you to jump through these hoops? –  Neil Barnwell Apr 2 '12 at 9:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I had this problem too.

You can use this:

public T Get<T>(string apiMethod) where T : class
        {
            T outputObject;
            lock (syncObj)
            {
                downloadHandle = new ManualResetEvent(false);

                ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(DownloadAsync), apiMethod);
                downloadHandle.WaitOne();
                outputObject = JsonHelper.Parse<T>(result);
            }
            return outputObject;
        }

protected void DownloadAsync(object _uri)
        {
            try
            {
                var url = _uri as string;
                WebClient client = new WebClient();
                client.DownloadStringCompleted += new DownloadStringCompletedEventHandler(client_DownloadStringCompleted);
                client.DownloadStringAsync(new Uri(GLOBALS.MAIN_API_URL + url, UriKind.Absolute));
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                downloadHandle.Set();
            }
        }

void client_DownloadStringCompleted(object sender, DownloadStringCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            (sender as WebClient).DownloadStringCompleted -= client_DownloadStringCompleted;

            try
            {
                result = e.Result;
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                result = ex.Message;
            }
            finally
            {
                downloadHandle.Set();
            }
        }

now you can use like this:

public Song GetSong(int _id)
        {
            var wr = Get<SongInfoWrapper>("info/song/" + _id);
            if (wr != null)
            {
                if (wr.Error == null)
                {
                    return wr.Element;
                }
            }

            return null;
        }

But be sure, that GetSong method called not in UI thread.

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WebClient raises the events on the UI thread if the request was started on the UI thread. So if you're waiting on the UI thread and don't give control to the main event loop, the events will be queued and thus never delivered.

Since WebClient does all the processing on the UI thread, Microsoft and many other recommend against using it. Instead, WebRequest should be used. It could even solve your problem. (Though blocking the UI thread isn't exactly a good thing to do.)

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I tried 'WebRequest' too. Effect was the same :( –  Thaven Apr 2 '12 at 10:48
    
You'll probably need to start the WebRequest on a background thread. Otherwise, the event can't be delivered to your blocking UI thread either. –  Codo Apr 2 '12 at 10:51

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