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I am thinking of protecting some of my website's forms with some captchas.

I see there are a few ready solutions, but since I am not really familiar with GD, and time is not really an issue, I thought I'd create my own captcha validation system.

How I think of it is I create 4-5 extremely simple questions, like "how much is X - Y?","If today is the Xth of the month, what is tomorrow?". ( X and Y random numbers between 1 and 20 )

Then I render the question in an image using GD and store the answer in a session variable so I can check.

My question is, given that no system is 100% safe, will the system above be decently safe or is it too easy?

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Are you aware that there's php libraries out there for captcha implementation? –  SiGanteng Apr 2 '12 at 10:01
    
Why would you render the answer to "How much is X - Y?"? Isn't the point of this to have a human calculate the answer himself? If you show the answer in an image, why would you need the question, the first place? –  Basti Apr 2 '12 at 10:02
    
store the answer in a session variable maybe better to store the question and calculate the answer on server side, not to store it at all –  k102 Apr 2 '12 at 10:02
    
@NiftyDude Could you please provide a link? –  AnPel Apr 2 '12 at 10:03
    
google.com/recaptcha –  SiGanteng Apr 2 '12 at 10:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Captchas provide pretty solid safety. OCRs are a threat, but there is nothing you can do against those sweat shops where thousands of people are employed to do nothing by answer captchas, and yes, they do exist.

As for the second method of asking human readable questions, I once remember somebody posting a small demo on HackerNews which could decode and answer almost any such question (If I find the link, I'll post it here).

I apologize that I don't have a definite answer for you, but in light of the above considerations, you might be able to make a better decision.

Link for the first case: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/26/technology/26captcha.html?_r=1&src=me&ref=technology

I myself can't believe I found this, but: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=1897932

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I REALLY hate non-readable captchas, so I thought I could give my users a break, but looks like this method is already pretty much cracked, unless I think of some smart questions that are not already on the scripts out there. –  AnPel Apr 2 '12 at 10:14
    
"unless I think of some smart questions that are not already on the scripts" is not a wise thing to say in a world where we fear the matrix and skynet ;) –  Rohan Prabhu Apr 2 '12 at 10:18
    
In HackerNews, does it answer text questions or it has a built in OCR too? –  AnPel Apr 2 '12 at 10:19
    
Answers only text questions, but an OCR could be easily added to it. To beat an OCR you would have to make the question difficult to read, so now your users have to read some obscure text, understand the question and then answer it: You lose way too many points on usability and user-friendliness there. –  Rohan Prabhu Apr 2 '12 at 10:21
    
It is still better than having them decide the letter that is totally unreadable, or gamble on it, and re-fill the whole form if they fail. Think I'll go with it, and when it fails or my site is big enough to be targeted, I'll go with the completely unreadable ones. –  AnPel Apr 2 '12 at 10:25

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