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I came across some Java code that had the following structure:

public MyParameterizedFunction(String param1, int param2)
{
    this(param1, param2, false);
}

public MyParameterizedFunction(String param1, int param2, boolean param3)
{
    //use all three parameters here
}

I know that in C++ I can assign a parameter a default value. For example:

void MyParameterizedFunction(String param1, int param2, bool param3=false);

Does Java support this kind of syntax? Are there any reasons why this two step syntax is preferable?

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14  
No. However, the Builder pattern can help. –  Dave Jarvis May 27 '10 at 2:58

13 Answers 13

up vote 304 down vote accepted

No, the structure you found is how Java handles it (that is, with overloading instead of default parameters).

For constructors, See Effective Java: Programming Language Guide's Item 1 tip (Consider static factory methods instead of constructors) if the overloading is getting complicated. For other methods, renaming some cases or using a parameter object can help. This is when you have enough complexity that differentiating is difficult. A definite case is where you have to differentiate using the order of parameters, not just number and type.

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No, but you can use the Builder Pattern, as described in this Stack Overflow answer.

As described in the linked answer, the Builder Pattern lets you write code like

Student s1 = new StudentBuilder().name("Eli").buildStudent();
Student s2 = new StudentBuilder()
                 .name("Spicoli")
                 .age(16)
                 .motto("Aloha, Mr Hand")
                 .buildStudent();

in which some fields can have default values or otherwise be optional.

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14  
I gained a huge bit of insight thanks to this post.. Really thanks –  baash05 Oct 4 '11 at 12:45
14  
Finally e great less-than-2-pages example of the Builder pattern. –  nevvermind Nov 8 '12 at 21:38
3  
Im curious though, why do we need a builder class when using the builder pattern. I was thinking of Student s1 = new Student().name("Spicolo").age(16).motto("Aloha, Mr Hand); –  ivanceras Feb 14 '13 at 8:32
13  
@ivanceras: It's relevant when classes have required fields, and you don't want to be able to instantiate those classes in an invalid state. So if you just said Student s1 = new Student().age(16); then that would leave you with a Student without a name, which might be bad. If it's not bad, then your solution is fine. –  Eli Courtwright Feb 14 '13 at 18:33
16  
@ivanceras: another reason is you might want your class to be immutable after construction, so you wouldn't want methods in it that change its values. –  Jules Feb 27 '13 at 16:02

Sadly, no.

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18  
Is it so sad? Doing so would introduce potentially ambiguous function signatures. –  Trey Jun 15 '09 at 19:46
1  
I agree with Trey. This isn't sad :) and since default parameters exists since a long time, I guess Java engineers have some good reasons to don't include it ;) –  AkiRoss Jan 21 '10 at 11:42
27  
@Trey: languages with default parameters often ditch function overloading since it is then less compelling. So no ambiguity. Beside, Scala added the feature in 2.8, and somehow solved the ambiguity issue (since they kept the overloading for compatibility reasons). –  PhiLho May 24 '11 at 13:09
5  
@Trey: read up how Ada implements overloading and default parameters and how Ada avoids ambiguity with named parameters. It take time to get the design right. Time the Java Team did not have. — PhiLho: Like Ada Scala has named parameter. A simple way to solve the problem. And they make the code better to read on top. –  Martin Sep 18 '11 at 12:53
7  
I fail to see how parameter defaults prevent function overloading. C# for instance allows overrides and also allows for default initializes. Seems like arbitrary choice, not restriction is the reason. –  FlavorScape Nov 30 '13 at 17:43

There are several ways to simulate default parameters in Java:

  1. Method overloading.

    void foo(String a, Integer b) {
        //...
    }
    
    void foo(String a) {
        foo(a, 0); // here, 0 is a default value for b
    }
    
    foo("a", 2);
    foo("a");
    

    One of the limitations of this approach is that it doesn't work if you have two optional parameters of the same type and any of them can be omitted.

  2. Varargs.

    a) All optional parameters are of the same type:

    void foo(String a, Integer... b) {
        Integer b1 = b.length > 0 ? b[0] : 0;
        Integer b2 = b.length > 1 ? b[1] : 0;
        //...
    }
    
    foo("a");
    foo("a", 1, 2);
    

    b) Types of optional parameters may be different:

    void foo(String a, Object... b) {
        Integer b1 = 0;
        String b2 = "";
        if (b.length > 0) {
          if (!(b[0] instanceof Integer)) { 
              throw new IllegalArgumentException("...");
          }
          b1 = (Integer)b[0];
        }
        if (b.length > 1) {
            if (!(b[1] instanceof String)) { 
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("...");
            }
            b2 = (String)b[1];
            //...
        }
        //...
    }
    
    foo("a");
    foo("a", 1);
    foo("a", 1, "b2");
    

    The main drawback of this approach is that if optional parameters are of different types you lose static type checking. Furthermore, if each parameter has different meaning you need some way to distinguish them.

  3. Nulls. To address the limitations of the previous approaches you can allow null values and then analyse each parameter in a method body:

    void foo(String a, Integer b, Integer c) {
        b = b != null ? b : 0;
        c = c != null ? c : 0;
        //...
    }
    
    foo("a", null, 2);
    

    Now all arguments values must be provided, but the default ones may be null.

  4. Optional class. This approach is similar to nulls, but uses guava Optional class for parameters that have a default value:

    void foo(String a, Optional<Integer> bOpt) {
        Integer b = bOpt.isPresent() ? bOpt.get() : 0;
        //...
    }
    
    foo("a", Optional.of(2));
    foo("a", Optional.<Integer>absent());
    

    Optional makes a method contract explicit for a caller, however, one may find such signature too verbose.

  5. Builder pattern. The builder pattern is used for constructors and is implemented by introducing a separate Builder class:

     class Foo {
         private final String a; 
         private final Integer b;
    
         Foo(String a, Integer b) {
           this.a = a;
           this.b = b;
         }
    
         //...
     }
    
     class FooBuilder {
       private String a = ""; 
       private Integer b = 0;
    
       FooBuilder setA(String a) {
         this.a = a;
         return this;
       }
    
       FooBuilder setB(Integer b) {
         this.b = b;
         return this;
       }
    
       Foo build() {
         return new Foo(a, b);
       }
     }
    
     Foo foo = new FooBuilder().setA("a").build();
    
  6. Maps. When the number of parameters is too large and for most of them default values are usually used, you can pass method arguments as a map of their names/values:

    void foo(Map<String, Object> parameters) {
        String a = ""; 
        Integer b = 0;
        if (parameters.containsKey("a")) { 
            if (!(parameters.get("a") instanceof Integer)) { 
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("...");
            }
            a = (String)parameters.get("a");
        }
        if (parameters.containsKey("b")) { 
            //... 
        }
        //...
    }
    
    foo(ImmutableMap.<String, Object>of(
        "a", "a",
        "b", 2, 
        "d", "value")); 
    

Please note that you can combine any of these approaches to achieve a desirable result.

share|improve this answer
    
Good explanation. I've never seen return values used like this. For 5) what do the return this do? Also, doesn't FooBuilder().setA("a").build(); since (by definition) the constructor is called first and FooBuilder() returns a value, doesn't this mean .setA("a"): doesn't get the chance to be called? –  Celeritas Jul 18 at 22:37
    
@Celeritas return this returns the same object on which the method was called (in the example, FooBuilder). This allows chaining of methods in one statement acting on the same object: new FooBuilder().setA(..).setB(..).setC(..) etc as opposed to calling each method in a separate statement. –  ADTC Aug 27 at 8:44
    
@Celeritas new FooBuilder() returns a FooBuilder object on which the setA method is called. As setB is not called, this.b retains the default value. Finally the build method is called on this FooBuilder object. The build method creates and returns a Foo object which is set to the variable Foo foo. Notice that the FooBuilder object is not stored in any variable. –  ADTC Aug 27 at 8:48
    
+1 now this is what I call a verbose answer! –  vaxquis Nov 23 at 19:40

Unfortunately, yes.

void MyParameterizedFunction(String param1, int param2, bool param3=false) {}

could be written in Java 1.5 as:

void MyParameterizedFunction(String param1, int param2, Boolean... params) {
    assert params.length <= 1;
    bool param3 = params.length > 0 ? params[0].booleanValue() : false;
}

But whether or not you should depend on how you feel about the compiler generating a

new Boolean[]{}

for each call.

For multiple defaultable parameters:

void MyParameterizedFunction(String param1, int param2, bool param3=false, int param4=42) {}

could be written in Java 1.5 as:

void MyParameterizedFunction(String param1, int param2, Object... p) {
    int l = p.length;
    assert l <= 2;
    assert l < 1 || Boolean.class.isInstance(p[0]);
    assert l < 2 || Integer.class.isInstance(p[1]);
    bool param3 = l > 0 && p[0] != null ? ((Boolean)p[0]).booleanValue() : false;
    int param4 = l > 1 && p[1] != null ? ((Integer)p[1]).intValue() : 42;
}

This matches C++ syntax, which only allows defaulted parameters at the end of the parameter list.

Beyond syntax, there is a difference where this has run time type checking for passed defaultable parameters and C++ type checks them during compile.

share|improve this answer
6  
Clever, but varargs (...) can only be used for the final parameter, which is more limiting than what languages supporting default parameters give you. –  CurtainDog May 26 '10 at 22:20
2  
I've added an example for multiple defaultable parameters. –  ebelisle May 27 '10 at 2:52
4  
that's clever but a bit messy compared to the C++ version –  Someone Somewhere Nov 4 '11 at 18:27
3  
Java definitely needs optional defaulted parameters as C# and others allow... the syntax is obvious and I presume they can implement this fairly simply even by just compiling all possible combinations... I cannot imagine why they haven't added it to the language yet! –  jlarson Feb 23 '12 at 23:31
3  
One should never use an assert in production code. Throw an exception. –  anthropomorphic Oct 1 '13 at 18:52

You can do this is in Scala, which runs on the JVM and is compatible with Java programs. http://www.scala-lang.org/

i.e.

class Foo(var prime: Boolean = false, val rib: String)  {}
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1  
or, he has add this feature to java...hmm, I like the way it sounds :P –  iamcreasy Oct 13 '11 at 7:41
16  
Bring whole new language to get one not so common feature? –  om-nom-nom Apr 3 '12 at 13:59
2  
@om-nom-nom: Java should never existed. Saying that a feature is not used is equivalent that nobody needs it is saying that Java was not popular before it was invented means that Gosling should not start designing it. –  Val Jun 15 '12 at 15:17
8  
@Val just saying that this is like shooting birds with cannons –  om-nom-nom Jun 15 '12 at 15:22

I might be stating the obvious here but why not simply implement the "default" parameter yourself?

public class Foo() {
        public void func(String s){
                func(s, true);
        }
        public void func(String s, boolean b){
                //your code here
        }
}

for the default you would ether use

func("my string");

and if you wouldn't like to use the default, you would use

func("my string", false);

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6  
The poster asked if this (rather ugly) pattern can be avoided ... ;-) In more modern languages (like c#, Scala) you don't need this extra overloads which only creates more lines of code. Up to some point you can use varargs in the meantime (static int max( int... array ) { }), but they are only a very ugly workaround. –  Offler Feb 18 '13 at 14:10
2  
Overloading is not ugly and has many benefits, such as different method calls with different signatures can perform different functionality. //This is better public class Foo() { /* This does something */ public void func(String s){ //do something } /* This does something else with b */ public void func(String s, boolean b){ // b was passed } } //Than this public class Foo() { /* This does something unless b = value, then it does something else */ public void func(String s, boolean b = value){ If (b){ // Do Something } else{ // Do something else } } } –  Antony Booth Nov 14 '13 at 19:57
    
Well, if one wants differing behaviour. If the only difference is a slight change in calculations, etc., it is sure a waste of effort to create multiple signatures. Defaults make sense where you need them to... and lack of it shouldn't be classified as a "useless" requirement. –  Kapil Jan 20 at 4:47

No. In general Java doesn't have much (any) syntactic sugar, since they tried to make a simple language.

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13  
Not quite. The bitter truth is that the team was on a tight schedule and had no time for syntactic sugar. Why else would const and goto be reserved keywords which no implementation? — Especially const is something I miss bitterly — final is no replacement and they knew it. — And if you made the concious decision to never implement goto you won't need to reserve the keyword. — And later in the Java Team cheated by making the Label based break and continue as powerful as a Pascal goto. –  Martin Sep 18 '11 at 12:46
    
"Simple, Object-Oriented and Familiar" was indeed a design goal - see oracle.com/technetwork/java/intro-141325.html –  mikera Sep 2 '13 at 9:27

There are half a dozen or better issues such as this, eventually you arrive at the static factory pattern ... see the crypto api for that. Sort difficult to explain, but think of it this way: If you have a constructor, default or otherwise, the only way to propagate state beyond the curly braces is either to have a Boolean isValid; ( along with the null as default value v failed constructor ) or throw an exception which is never informative when getting it back from field users.

Code Correct be damned, I write thousand line constructors and do what I need. I find using isValid at object construction - in other words, two line constructors - but for some reason I am migrating to the static factory pattern. I just seems you can do a lot if you in a method call, there are still sync() issues but defaults can be 'substituted' better ( safer )

I think what we need to do here is address the issue of null as default value vis-a-vis something String one=new String(""); as a member variable, then doing a check for null before assigning string passed to the constructor.

Very remarkable the amount of raw, stratospheric computer science done in Java.

C++ and so on has vendor libs, yes. Java can outrun them on large scale servers due to it's massive toolbox. Study static initializer blocks, stay with us.

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It is not supported but there are several options like using parameter object pattern with some syntax sugar:

public class Foo() {
    private static class ParameterObject {
        int param1 = 1;
        String param2 = "";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Foo().myMethod(new ParameterObject() {{ param1 = 10; param2 = "bar";}});
    }

    private void myMethod(ParameterObject po) {
    }
}

In this sample we construct ParameterObject with default values and override them in class instance initialization section { param1 = 10; param2 = "bar";}

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Try this solution:

public int getScore(int score, Integer... bonus)
{
    if(bonus.length > 0)
    {
        return score + bonus[0];
    }

    return score;
}
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No.

You can achieve the same behavior by passing an Object which has smart defaults. But again it depends what your case is at hand.

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You can very simply emulate them. What in C++ was:

public: void myFunction(int a, int b=5, string c="test") { ... }

In Java, it will be an overloaded function:

public void myFunction(Integer a, Integer b, String c) { ... }

public void myFunction(Integer a, Integer b) {
    myFunction(a, b, "test");
}

public void myFunction(Integer a) {
    myfunction(a, 5);
}

Earlier was mentioned, that default parameters caused ambigous cases in function overloading. That is simply not true, we can seein the case of the C++: yes, maybe it can create ambigous cases, but these problem ca be easily handled. It simply wasn't developed in Java, probably because the creators wanted a much simpler language as C++ was - if they had right, is another question. But most uf us don't think he uses Java because of its simplicity.

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