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For a homework assignment, I'm working with the following. It's an assigned class structure, I know it's not the best design by a long shot.

Class           | Extends         | Variables
--------------------------------------------------------
Person          | None            | firstName, lastName, streetAddress, zipCode, phone
CollegeEmployee | Person          | ssn, salary,deptName
Faculty         | CollegeEmployee | tenure(boolean)
Student         | person          | GPA,major

So in the Faculty class...

 public class Faculty extends CollegeEmployee
 {
      protected String booleanFlag;
      protected boolean tenured;
      public Faculty(String firstName, String lastName, String streetAddress,
                     String zipCode, String phoneNumber,String ssn,
                     String department,double salary)
      { 
           super(firstName,lastName,streetAddress,zipCode,phoneNumber,
                 ssn,department,salary);
           String booleanFlag = JOptionPane.showInputDialog
                                (null, "Tenured (Y/N)?");
           if(booleanFlag.equals("Y"))
           tenured = true;
           else
           tenured = false;
       }
 }

It was my understanding that super() in Faculty would allow access to the variables in CollegeEmployee as well as Person. With the code above, it compiles fine when I ONLY include the Person variables. As soon as I try to use ssn, department, or salary I get the following compile errors.

 Faculty.java:15: error: constructor CollegeEmployee in class CollegeEmployee can not be applied to the given types:
            super(firstName,lastName,streetAddress,zipCode,phoneNumber,ssn,department,salary);
                                                                                            ^
Required: String,String,String,String,String
   Found: String,String,String,String,String,String,String,String
  reason: actual and formal argument lists differ in length

I'm completely confused by this error...which is the actual and formal? Person has five arguments, CollegeEmployee has 3, so my guess is that something's funky with how the parameters are being passed...but I'm not quite sure where to begin fixing it. What am I missing?

Here's my CollegeEmployee class

 import java.util.*;
 import javax.swing.*;
 //
 public class CollegeEmployee extends Person
 {
     protected String ssn;
     protected String sal;
     protected double annSalary;
     protected String department;
 //
     public CollegeEmployee(String firstName, String lastName, 
                            String streetAddress, String zipCode, 
                            String phoneNumber)
     {
          super(firstName,lastName,streetAddress,zipCode,phoneNumber);
          ssn = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null, "Enter SSN ");
          department = JOptionPane.showInputDialog
                       (null, "Enter department: ");
          sal = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null, "Enter salary: ");
         annSalary = Double.parseDouble(sal);
     }
 //
     public void setSSN(String ssn)
     {         this.ssn = ssn;         }
     public void setAnnSalary(double annSalary)
     {        this.annSalary = annSalary;     }
     public void setDepartment(String department)
     {        this.department = department;    }
 //
     public String getSSN()
     {        return ssn;                }
     public double getAnnSalary()
     {        return annSalary;          }
     public String getDepartment()
     {        return department;         }
 //
     public void display()
     {
         super.display();
         JOptionPane.showMessageDialog
         (null, "\nSSN: " + getSSN() + "\nAnnual Salary: " 
          + getAnnSalary() + "\nDepartment: " + getDepartment(), 
          "Information", JOptionPane.QUESTION_MESSAGE);
     }
 }
share|improve this question
1  
One of the parameters of the constructor is Department, and you pass it to super as department. –  Eng.Fouad Apr 2 '12 at 10:58
1  
Before correcting the code you should indent it, makes all the difference looking at indented code!! –  MrJames Apr 2 '12 at 11:06
    
@Eng.Fouad Made that case correction, and also a semicolon that I missed...but now there's another another related error... :| –  dwwilson66 Apr 2 '12 at 11:28
    
@MrJames: indented...I had LF instead of CR when I cut and pasted. D'oh! –  dwwilson66 Apr 2 '12 at 11:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You made an accidental ; at the end of your constructor:

      public Faculty(String firstName, String lastName, String streetAddress,   String zipCode, String phoneNumber,String ssn,
           String Department,double salary); // <--- this has to go

And as pointed out in a comment you have String Department in your constructor, but you pass department (incorrect capitalization), rename your constructor argument to String department

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes. Extra-semicolon makes the constructor-body an instance initialization block which is perfectly legal. –  heikkim Apr 2 '12 at 10:59
    
@heikkim: but the super call isn't correct in this instance initialization block, right? The initialization block is run after calling super() –  thumbmunkeys Apr 2 '12 at 11:02
1  
You are right, it is not. Sorry for being ambiguous. I was simply referring to the location of the block, not the contents of the block. –  heikkim Apr 2 '12 at 11:12
    
D'oh! it's always the simple things.... –  dwwilson66 Apr 2 '12 at 12:28
    
glad to help, most things are simple once you know them :) –  thumbmunkeys Apr 2 '12 at 12:33

Remove the ; at the end of the constructor declaration line:

public Faculty(String firstName, String lastName, String streetAddress, String zipCode, String phoneNumber,String ssn,String Department,double salary);
//----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------^
share|improve this answer

Remove the ';' at the end of 'ment,double salary);'

public Faculty(String firstName, String lastName, String streetAddress, String zipCode, String phoneNumber,String ssn,String Department,double salary); <--- remove this
      {
share|improve this answer

Your super class CollegeEmployee needs to have a constructor with this eight arguments, also the argument types should match

public class CollegeEmployee
{
    public CollegeEmployee(String firstName, String lastName, String streetAddress, String zipCode,
                        String phoneNumber, String ssn, String department, double salary)
    { 
        // do stuff
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@MrJames- I added my CollegeEmployee class...are you saying that the NEW variables (the three NOT inherited from Person) should be cast in the constructor parameters? and is that in addition to or instead of the variable declaration the appears ABOVE the constructor? –  dwwilson66 Apr 2 '12 at 12:15
    
What I'm saying is that on your Faculty constructor you are calling super (that calls CollegeEmployee constructor) with eight arguments but on the class CollegeEmployee you don't have a constructor with eight parameters –  MrJames Apr 2 '12 at 13:07

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