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How would I go about doing this:

for( var i = 0; i < emp; i++ )
{
    Console.WriteLine("Name: ");
    var name = Console.ReadLine();

    Console.WriteLine("Nationality:");
    var country = Console.ReadLine();

    employeeList.Add( new Employee(){
                        Name = name,
                        Nationality = country
                     } );
}

I want a test run of, for example:

Imran Khan
Pakistani

to generate an XML File:

<employee>
   <name> Imran Khan </name>
   <nationality> Pakistani </nationality>
</employee>

Any suggestions?

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possible duplicate of What is the best way to build XML in C# code? –  TJHeuvel Apr 2 '12 at 10:59
    
Many ways to do this - serialization or direct output using custom classes or LINQ to XML (for example). –  Oded Apr 2 '12 at 11:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My suggestion is to use xml serialization:

[XmlRoot("employee")]
public class Employee {
    [XmlElement("name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("nationality")]
    public string Nationality { get; set; }
}

void Main() {
    // ...
    var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Employee));
    var emp = new Employee { /* properties... */ };
    using (var output = /* open a Stream or a StringWriter for output */) {
        serializer.Serialize(output, emp);
    }
}
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+1, thinking of the third-party libraries for xml I used in C++, C# xml serialization looks irresistable. –  ApprenticeHacker Apr 2 '12 at 11:07

There are several ways, but the one I like is using the class XDocument.

Here's a nice example on how to do it. What is the best way to build XML in C# code?

If you have any questions, just ask.

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var xelement = new XElement("employee", 
   new XElement("name", employee.Name),
   new XElement("nationality", employee.Nationality),
);

xelement.Save("file.xml");
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<employee>
   <name> Imran Khan </name>
   <nationality> Pakistani </nationality>
</employee>

XElement x = new  XElement ("employee",new XElement("name",e.name),new XElement("nationality",e.nationality) );
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To give you an idea of how XDocument works based on your loop, you would do this:

XDocument xdoc = new XDocument();
xdoc.Add(new XElement("employees"));
for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
     Console.WriteLine("Name: ");
     var name = Console.ReadLine();

      Console.WriteLine("Nationality:");
      var country = Console.ReadLine();

      XElement el = new XElement("employee");
      el.Add(new XElement("name", name), new XElement("country", country));
      xdoc.Element("employees").Add(el);
}

After running, xdoc would be something like:

<employees>
  <employee>
    <name>bob</name>
    <country>us</country>
  </employee>
  <employee>
    <name>jess</name>
    <country>us</country>
  </employee>
</employees>
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