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I am a Ruby newbie.
How can I write better for this function? can i use a hash table instead.

def readable_status(status)
  if status == "1" 
    return "go"
  end
  if status == "2"
    return "stop"
  end
  if status == "3"
    return "die"
  end
end
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you wanted to use a hash (as per your question) you could do:

def readable_status(status)
   readable = { "1" => "go", "2" => "stop", "3" => "die" }
   readable[status] || "default value"
end
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default value is cool!! –  Kit Ho Apr 2 '12 at 11:03
4  
+1. Or readable.fetch(status, "default_value"), which might be easier to understand for someone new to Ruby (I prefer your version though). –  Michael Kohl Apr 2 '12 at 11:08
    
How can we use readable.fetch? –  Kit Ho Apr 2 '12 at 11:32
    
@KitHo Exactly as stated in my comment... –  Michael Kohl Apr 2 '12 at 12:22
1  
@MichaelKohl: Hash#fetch is cool. The only difference would be if getting the default value is a costy operation, then || would be better because it's lazy. –  tokland Apr 2 '12 at 12:28

How about

def readable_status(status)
  %w{go stop die}[status.to_i - 1]
end
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very nice :) +1 –  the_joric Apr 2 '12 at 13:41
    
i think this is not so good as it make the code harder to read –  Kit Ho Apr 2 '12 at 15:40

sure, just use

def readable_status(status)
    m = {'1' => 'go', '2' => 'stop', '3' => 'die'}
    m[status]
end

you can make it oneliner if you wish:

...
{'1' => 'go', '2' => 'stop', '3' => 'die'}[status]
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1  
This is nice, though I recommend (to the Ruby newbie OP) to NOT just make a hash constant that is dereferenced when the value is wanted, but instead to leave this logic inside a method wrapper. As @karatedog says, your needs sometimes change; if you keep this in a method you can change the implementation to use more than just a Hash without affecting other areas of your code. –  Phrogz Apr 2 '12 at 12:22

I have failed attempts with Hash-es for this problem because of suboptimal specification which was given me (meaning: business changed specification during development).

Hashes are good until you need to write something a bit more complex than a single value. If you need to change those single values to methods, you have to rewrite everything, as Hashes take the value of the methods by calling them when the hash is defined. And if later the method's return value changes, hashes will not be changed.

And it remains readable English :-)

def readable_status(status)
  case status 
    when "1" then "go" end
    when "2" then "stop" end
    when "3" then "die" end
  end
end
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If the hash is defined inside the method, the hash (and every string in it) is recreated everytime the method is called. Defining a constant prevents this; using a method to acces the values keeps flexibility, as @Phrogz said.

READABLE_STATUS_TABLE = {'1'=>'go', '2'=>'stop', '3'=>'die'}

def readable_status(status)
  READABLE_STATUS_TABLE[status]
end
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