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How can I write a typesafe Java-method that returns either something of class a or something of class b? For example:

public ... either(boolean b) {
  if (b) {
    return new Integer(1);
  } else {
    return new String("hi");
  }
}

What is the cleanest way ? Probably there is a common pattern to do this?

( The only thing that comes to my mind is using exceptions which is obviously bad, as it is abusing a error-handling mechanism for a general language feature ...

public String either(boolean b) throws IntException {
  if (b) {
    return new String("test");
  } else {
    throw new IntException(new Integer(1));
  }
}

)

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6  
you can use scala –  shem Apr 2 '12 at 11:58
7  
Unfortunately, attempting to use any good (whether haskell-ish or not) style in Java tends to result in verbose code, which is not good style, and therefore it is impossible. In all honesty, although it pains me, I'd probably just throw two exceptions as a hack... –  alternative Apr 2 '12 at 12:34
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10 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

My general formula for simulating algebraic data types is: The type is an abstract base class, and the constructors are subclasses of that. The data for each constructor are defined in each subclass. (This allows constructors with different numbers of data to work correctly. It also removes the need to maintain invariants like only one variable is non-null or stuff like that.) The constructors of the subclasses serve to construct the value for each constructor. To deconstruct it, one uses instanceof to check the constructor, and downcast to the appropriate type to get the data.

So for Either a b, it would be something like this:

abstract class Either<A, B> { }
class Left<A, B> extends Either<A, B> {
    public A left_value;
    public Left(A a) { left_value = a; }
}
class Right<A, B> extends Either<A, B> {
    public B right_value;
    public Right(B b) { right_value = b; }
}

// to construct it
Either<A, B> foo = new Left<A, B>(some_A_value);
Either<A, B> bar = new Right<A, B>(some_B_value);

// to deconstruct it
if (foo instanceof Left) {
    Left<A, B> foo_left = (Left<A, B>)foo;
    // do stuff with foo_left.a
} else if (foo instanceof Right) {
    Right<A, B> foo_right = (Right<A, B>)foo;
    // do stuff with foo_right.b
}
share|improve this answer
    
even better :-) Short and concise. Everyone with a course on algebraic datatypes and basic java knowledge should understand this. Well-done! –  Bastl Apr 5 '12 at 10:49
    
That's about the same approach as having isLeft, getAsLeft and getAsRight methods. It is not type safe (it relies on correct client code): You can have exceptions when casting if you mess it client-side. –  ziggystar Apr 16 '12 at 8:56
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Here is a statically checked type-safe solution; this means you cannot create runtime errors. Please read the previous sentence in the way it is meant. Yes, you can provoke exceptions in some way or the other...

It's pretty verbose, but hey, it's Java!

public class Either<A,B> {
    interface Function<T> {
        public void apply(T x);
    }

    private A left = null;
    private B right = null;
    private Either(A a,B b) {
        left = a;
        right = b;
    }

    public static <A,B> Either<A,B> left(A a) {
        return new Either<A,B>(a,null);
    }
    public static <A,B> Either<A,B> right(B b) {
        return new Either<A,B>(null,b);
    }

    /* Here's the important part: */
    public void fold(Function<A> ifLeft, Function<B> ifRight) {
        if(right == null)
            ifLeft.apply(left);
        else
            ifRight.apply(right);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Either<String,Integer> e1 = Either.left("foo");
        e1.fold(
                new Function<String>() {
                    public void apply(String x) {
                        System.out.println(x);
                    }
                },
                new Function<Integer>() {
                    public void apply(Integer x) {
                        System.out.println("Integer: " + x);
                    }
                });
    }
}

You might want to look at Functional Java and Tony Morris' excellent blog.

Here is the link to the implementation of Either in Functional Java. The fold in my example is called either there. They have a more sophisticated version of fold, that is able to return a value (which seems appropriate for functional programming style).

share|improve this answer
    
so you bind the type by defining the function, right? It is just to trick the compiler and it could also be empty? –  Bastl Apr 2 '12 at 12:40
    
and just for the records: The Either.left/right are the actual constructors in the algebraic sense? –  Bastl Apr 2 '12 at 12:40
2  
@Bastl left/right are the constructors. I'm no Haskell person and don't really understand what you meanwith "bind the type". The Function is just a Helper class (for first-class functions) and could be defined somewhere else. There's nothing that could be empty here. The trick is that fold only calls the correctly typed function. The calling code always has to provide handling functions for A and B. –  ziggystar Apr 2 '12 at 12:44
    
Note that in FunctionalJava the data is stored in one of two inner classes "Left" or "Right" which only have the corresponding private field. The example above always has both fields with (at least) one of them null. (But this is not enforced by the constructor above!) –  Chris Kuklewicz Apr 3 '12 at 10:59
1  
@ChrisKuklewicz Well, it is. The constructor is private and the factory methods enforce this. –  ziggystar Apr 3 '12 at 11:03
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You can have a close correspondence with Haskell by writing a generic class Either, parametric on two types L and R with two constructors (one taking in an L, and one taking in an R) and two methods L getLeft() and R getRight() such that they either return the value passed when constructing, or throw an exception.

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does not work for me due to some type erasure message !? –  Bastl Apr 2 '12 at 12:03
1  
Make Either abstract and declare L getLeft() and R getRight() and bool isRight(). Now, make LeftEither and RightEither with correct constructors to avoid the type erasure collision between the two constructors. [Darn you, type erasure!] –  alternative Apr 2 '12 at 12:22
    
@alternative: thanks for specifying, I didn't think about type erasure. –  Riccardo Apr 2 '12 at 14:20
    
Alternatively, one could specify two constructors Either(L left, Void right) and Either(Void left, R right). Since Void is uninstantiable, one of the two arguments must always be null, resolving the ambiguity (although the actual value wrapped by Either can now not be null itself, but this could also be considered a feature and not a bug). –  arne.b Apr 3 '12 at 7:15
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The suggestions already provided, although feasible, are not complete as they rely on some null references and effectively make "Either" masquerade as a tuple of values. A disjoint sum is obviously one type or the other.

I'd suggest having a look at the implementation of FunctionalJava's Either as an example.

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1  
The encoding in FunctionalJava is the most accurate of these answers (when I wrote this comment at least). Also see the longer example at blog.tmorris.net/… for more inspiration about sum types in Java. –  Chris Kuklewicz Apr 2 '12 at 12:40
    
@ChrisKuklewicz Thanks for the link - I couldn't find it at the time :) –  gpampara Apr 2 '12 at 12:51
    
404. New link:blog.tmorris.net/posts/… –  Philip Durbin Feb 26 at 13:26
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The big thing is not to try to write in one language whilst writing in another. Generally in Java you want to put the behaviour in the object, rather than having a "script" running outside with encapsulation destroyed by get methods. There is no context for making that kind of suggestion here.

One safe way of dealing with this particular little fragment is to write it as a callback. Similar to a very simple visitor.

public interface Either {
    void string(String value);
    void integer(int value);
}

public void either(Either handler, boolean b) throws IntException {
    if (b) {
        handler.string("test");
    } else {
        handler.integer(new Integer(1));
    }
}

You may well want to implement with pure functions and return a value to the calling context.

public interface Either<R> {
    R string(String value);
    R integer(int value);
}

public <R> R either(Either<? extends R> handler, boolean b) throws IntException {
    return b ?
        handler.string("test") :
        handler.integer(new Integer(1));
}

(Use Void (capital 'V') if you want to get back to being uninterested in the return value.)

share|improve this answer
    
Many would argue that the inversion of control you propose makes for more obtuse code. But less subjectively, Java imposes major performance penalty: no tail call optimization. Consider, chaining together a bunch of functions that take/return an Either uses constant stack space. With the visitor pattern, whether you pass in a stack of handlers or even hard code in specific handlers, you use O(number of handlers) stack space. TL;DR: visitor pattern unnecessarily denigrates space efficiency in Java. –  Sonarpulse Dec 7 '13 at 22:28
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From http://blog.tmorris.net/posts/maybe-in-java/ I learned that you can make the out class's constructor private so only nested classes can subclass it. This trick is just as type safe as the best above, but much less verbose, works for any ADT you want like Scala's case class.

public abstract class Either<A, B> {
    private Either() { } // makes this a safe ADT
    public abstract boolean isRight();
    public final static class Left<L, R> extends Either<L, R>  {
        public final L left_value;
        public Left(L l) { left_value = l; }
        public boolean isRight() { return false; }
    }
    public final static class Right<L, R> extends Either<L, R>  {
        public final R right_value;
        public Right(R r) { right_value = r; }
        public boolean isRight() { return true; }
    }
}

(started from top answer's code and style)

Note that:

  • The finals on the subclass are optional. Without them you can subtype Left and Right, but still not Either directly. Thus without the finals Either has limited width but unbounded depth.

  • With ADTs like this, I see no reason to jump on the whole anti-instanceof bandwagon. A boolean works for Maybe or Either, but in general instanceof is your best and only option.

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I've implemented it in a Scala-like fashion in the following way. It's a little verbose (it is Java, after all :)) but it's type safe.

public interface Choice {    
  public enum Type {
     LEFT, RIGHT
  }

  public Type getType();

  interface Get<T> {
     T value();
  }
}

public abstract class Either<A, B> implements Choice {

  private static class Base<A, B> extends Either<A, B> {
    @Override
    public Left leftValue() {
      throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
    }

    @Override
    public Right rightValue() {
      throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
    }

    @Override
    public Type getType() {
      throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
    }
  }

  public abstract Left leftValue();

  public abstract Right rightValue();

  public static <A, B> Either<A, B> left(A value) {
    return new Base<A, B>().new Left(value);
  }

  public static <A, B> Either<A, B> right(B value) {
    return new Base<A, B>().new Right(value);
  }

  public class Left extends Either<A, B> implements Get<A> {

    private A value;

    public Left(A value) {
      this.value = value;
    }

    @Override
    public Type getType() {
      return Type.LEFT;
    }

    @Override
    public Left leftValue() {
      return Left.this;
    }

    @Override
    public Right rightValue() {
      return null;
    }

    @Override
    public A value() {
      return value;    
    }
  }

  public class Right extends Either<A, B> implements Get<B> {

    private B value;

    public Right(B value) {
      this.value = value;
    }

    @Override
    public Left leftValue() {
      return null;
    }

    @Override
    public Right rightValue() {
      return this;
    }

    @Override
    public Type getType() {
      return Type.RIGHT;
    }

    @Override
    public B value() {
      return value;
    }
  }
}

Then you can pass Either<A,B> instances around on your code. The Type enum is mainly used on switch statements.

Creating Either values is simple as:

Either<A, B> underTest;

A value = new A();

underTest = Either.left(value);

assertEquals(Choice.Type.LEFT, underTest.getType());
assertSame(underTest, underTest.leftValue());
assertNull(underTest.rightValue());
assertSame(value, underTest.leftValue().value());

Or, in the typical situation where it is used instead of exceptions,

public <Error, Result> Either<Error,Result> doSomething() {
    // pseudo code
    if (ok) {
        Result value = ...
        return Either.right(value);
    } else {
        Error errorMsg = ...
        return Either.left(errorMsg);
    }
}

// somewhere in the code...

Either<Err, Res> result = doSomething();
switch(result.getType()) {
   case Choice.Type.LEFT:
      // Handle error
      Err errorValue = result.leftValue().value();
      break;
   case Choice.Type.RIGHT:
      // Process result
      Res resultValue = result.rightValue().value();
      break;
}

Hope it helps.

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Since you've tagged Scala, I'll give a Scala answer. Just use the existing Either class. Here's an example usage:

def whatIsIt(flag: Boolean): Either[Int,String] = 
  if(flag) Left(123) else Right("hello")

//and then later on...

val x = whatIsIt(true)
x match {
  case Left(i) => println("It was an int: " + i)
  case Right(s) => println("It was a string: " + s)
}

This is completely type-safe; you won't have problems with erasure or anything like that... And if you simply can't use Scala, at least use this as an example of how you can implement your own Either class.

share|improve this answer
    
Just tagged to get attention from ppl knowing both sides of the world. ;-) –  Bastl Apr 2 '12 at 12:20
    
One thing that i really like in either is that you can write your signature as def foo(bar: Boolean) : Int Either String = .... I think it is closer to the meaning behind Either. –  om-nom-nom Apr 2 '12 at 13:00
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The closest I can think of is a wrapper around both values that lets you check which value is set and retrieve it:

class Either<TLeft, TRight> {
    boolean isLeft;

    TLeft left;
    TRight right;

    Either(boolean isLeft, TLeft left1, TRight right) {
        isLeft = isLeft;
        left = left;
        this.right = right;
    }

    public boolean isLeft() {
        return isLeft;
    }

    public TLeft getLeft() {
        if (isLeft()) {
            return left;
        } else {
            throw new RuntimeException();
        }
    }

    public TRight getRight() {
        if (!isLeft()) {
            return right;
        } else {
            throw new RuntimeException();
        }
    }

    public static <L, R> Either<L, R> newLeft(L left, Class<R> rightType) {
        return new Either<L, R>(true, left, null);
    }

    public static <L, R> Either<L, R> newRight(Class<L> leftType, R right) {
        return new Either<L, R>(false, null, right);
    }
}

class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Either<String,Integer> foo;
        foo = getString();
        foo = getInteger();
    }

    private static Either<String, Integer> getInteger() {
        return Either.newRight(String.class, 123);
    }

    private static Either<String, Integer> getString() {
        return Either.newLeft("abc", Integer.class);
    }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
passing the type and a boolean around seems not nice ... –  Bastl Apr 2 '12 at 12:05
    
@Bastl The boolean is hidden by the newLeft and newRight methods - it's an implementation detail. I chose to pass the class to the factory methods so I can use what little type inference Java has. The alternative would be using explicit generic parameters to the method call, which is uglier. –  millimoose Apr 2 '12 at 12:08
1  
@Bastl If you want this done "nicely", use Haskell. You're asking for a feature which is a terrible fit for Java, any straightforward implementation will thus look terrible. –  millimoose Apr 2 '12 at 12:08
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Change your design so that you don't need this rather absurd feature. Anything you'd do with the return value would require some sort of if/else construct. It would just be very, very ugly.

From a quick Googling, it seems to me that the only thing Haskell's Either is commonly used for is error reporting anyway, so it looks like exceptions are actually to correct replacement.

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3  
But it is much more powerful that using exceptions. This feature is called algebraic / disjoint sum, I don't think it is absurd.... –  Bastl Apr 2 '12 at 11:59
1  
@Bastl Remember that Java has OO. If you need to return two different data types from a method, you can usually return their common supertype, and have polymorphism handle the different behaviour for each variant. –  millimoose Apr 2 '12 at 12:04
1  
Inheritance is a dangerous thing. The consequence is to return "Object" in my initial example, and type-safety is gone ... –  Bastl Apr 2 '12 at 12:07
    
@Bastl A workaround would be creating such as StringHolder and IntegerHolder that extend ValueHolder which defines the polymorphic behaviour. That said I find it hard to imagine an actual use case for having a method return one of two completely unrelated basic types. –  millimoose Apr 2 '12 at 12:14
    
@Bastl: so it's more pwerful in theory, but nobody seems to have found it useful for anything other than exceptions. Same thing. If you like to explore type systems for their conceptual beauty rather than practicall usefulness, I suspect you'll never be happy with Java... –  Michael Borgwardt Apr 2 '12 at 12:16
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